31st Marine Expeditionary Unit

 

31st Marine Expeditionary Unit

The only continuously forward-deployed MEU

Okinawa, Japan
Republic of Korea Rear Admiral Jong Sam Kim shakes Marines' hands after a capabilities demontration on Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Nov.30, 2016. The Marines were with 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. 31st MEU Marines continue to participate in events with their ROK counterparts to strengthen interoperability and partnerships. (U.S. Marine Corps. photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales/released)
31st MEU Marines demonstrate a static display to Republic of Korea Marines, sailors
Republic of Korea Rear Admiral Jong Sam Kim shakes Marines' hands after a capabilities demontration on Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Nov.30, 2016. The Marines were with 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. 31st MEU Marines continue to participate in events with their ROK counterparts to strengthen interoperability and partnerships. (U.S. Marine Corps. photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales/released)
A MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 262, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, is refueled by Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) members at Oruma Air Base, Nagasaki, Japan, Nov. 18, 2016. The aircraft flew from the island of Okinawa, conducted simulated humanitarian aid with the JMSDF at multiple locations and was refueled by JMSDF personnel before returning to Okinawa. The aircraft also conducted a passenger exercise carrying Sasebo Mayor Norio Tomonaga and the Assemblymen of Defense for Sasebo City. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
Marine Osprey refueled by Japanese Defense Force
A MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 262, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, is refueled by Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) members at Oruma Air Base, Nagasaki, Japan, Nov. 18, 2016. The aircraft flew from the island of Okinawa, conducted simulated humanitarian aid with the JMSDF at multiple locations and was refueled by JMSDF personnel before returning to Okinawa. The aircraft also conducted a passenger exercise carrying Sasebo Mayor Norio Tomonaga and the Assemblymen of Defense for Sasebo City. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
Col. Tye R. Wallace, commander of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, cuts a birthday cake as part of the Marine Corps Birthday Ball ceremony at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Nov. 11, 2016. The Marines were celebrating the 241st birthday of the U.S. Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Amy Phan, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/Released)
31st MEU celebrates 241st Marine Corps Birthday Ball
Col. Tye R. Wallace, commander of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, cuts a birthday cake as part of the Marine Corps Birthday Ball ceremony at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Nov. 11, 2016. The Marines were celebrating the 241st birthday of the U.S. Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Amy Phan, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/Released)
Cpl. Doug Dicka, a force reconnaissance Marine with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, takes aim aboard a MH-60S Seahawk helicopter during aerial sniper training above the Pacific Ocean, Oct. 22, 2016. As the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward deployed unit, the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit is prepared to respond to a wide range of military operations, from humanitarian assistance missions to limited combat operations, at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. David A. Diggs/ Released)
31st MEU snipers refine aerial targeting capabilities
Cpl. Doug Dicka, a force reconnaissance Marine with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, takes aim aboard a MH-60S Seahawk helicopter during aerial sniper training above the Pacific Ocean, Oct. 22, 2016. As the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward deployed unit, the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit is prepared to respond to a wide range of military operations, from humanitarian assistance missions to limited combat operations, at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. David A. Diggs/ Released)
U.S. Marine Corps MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fly west above the Pacific Ocean during scheduled flight operations after departing the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), Sept. 26, 2016. VMM-262 is the Aviation Combat Element for the 31st MEU, and features a variety of fixed-wing, rotary-wing and tiltrotor aircraft. As the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward deployed unit, the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit is prepared to respond to a wide range of military operations, from humanitarian assistance missions to limited combat operations, at a moment’s notice. As a balanced air-ground-logistics team, the 31st MEU is ready to respond throughout the Asia-Pacific region.
Ospreys in flight
U.S. Marine Corps MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fly west above the Pacific Ocean during scheduled flight operations after departing the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), Sept. 26, 2016. VMM-262 is the Aviation Combat Element for the 31st MEU, and features a variety of fixed-wing, rotary-wing and tiltrotor aircraft. As the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward deployed unit, the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit is prepared to respond to a wide range of military operations, from humanitarian assistance missions to limited combat operations, at a moment’s notice. As a balanced air-ground-logistics team, the 31st MEU is ready to respond throughout the Asia-Pacific region.
Philippine Marines join U.S. Marines with Fox Company, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, during combat rubber raiding craft training as part of Philippine Amphibious Landing Exercise 33 (PHIBLEX) off the coast of Marine Barracks Gregorio Lim, Ternate, Philippines, Oct. 5, 2016. PHIBLEX 33 is an annual bilateral exercise conducted with the Armed Forces of the Philippines that combines amphibious capabilities and live-fire training with humanitarian civic assistance efforts to strengthen interoperability and working relationships through commitment, capability and cooperation. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
Philippine, U.S. Marines refine boat raid capabilities
Philippine Marines join U.S. Marines with Fox Company, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, during combat rubber raiding craft training as part of Philippine Amphibious Landing Exercise 33 (PHIBLEX) off the coast of Marine Barracks Gregorio Lim, Ternate, Philippines, Oct. 5, 2016. PHIBLEX 33 is an annual bilateral exercise conducted with the Armed Forces of the Philippines that combines amphibious capabilities and live-fire training with humanitarian civic assistance efforts to strengthen interoperability and working relationships through commitment, capability and cooperation. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
Marines with Company G, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, conduct an amphibious assault dry rehearsal during Philippine Amphibious Landing Exercise 33 (PHIBLEX), at the Naval Education and Training Command, Philippines, Oct. 6, 2016. PHIBLEX 33 is an annual bilateral exercise conducted with the Armed Forces of the Philippines that combines amphibious capabilities and live-fire training with humanitarian civic assistance efforts to strengthen interoperability and working relationships through commitment, capability and cooperation. (US. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales)
Marines conduct an amphibious assault rehearsal
Marines with Company G, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, conduct an amphibious assault dry rehearsal during Philippine Amphibious Landing Exercise 33 (PHIBLEX), at the Naval Education and Training Command, Philippines, Oct. 6, 2016. PHIBLEX 33 is an annual bilateral exercise conducted with the Armed Forces of the Philippines that combines amphibious capabilities and live-fire training with humanitarian civic assistance efforts to strengthen interoperability and working relationships through commitment, capability and cooperation. (US. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales)
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Philippine Marine Staff Sgt. Bernaje G. Canindo, a reconnisance marine, demonstrates fire making to U.S. Marines assigned to Fox Company, Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, during a jungle survival class as part of Philippine Amphibious Landing Exercise 33 (PHIBLEX), at Marine Barracks Gregorio Lim, Ternate, Philippines, Oct. 6, 2016. PHIBLEX 33 is an annual bilateral exercise conducted with the Armed Forces of the Philippines that combines amphibious capabilities and live-fire training with humanitarian civic assistance efforts to strengthen interoperability and working relationships through commitment, capability and cooperation. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal/ Released)
Philippine, U.S. Marines partner during PHIBLEX 33
Subscribe 76 Philippine Marine Staff Sgt. Bernaje G. Canindo, a reconnisance marine, demonstrates fire making to U.S. Marines assigned to Fox Company, Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, during a jungle survival class as part of Philippine Amphibious Landing Exercise 33 (PHIBLEX), at Marine Barracks Gregorio Lim, Ternate, Philippines, Oct. 6, 2016. PHIBLEX 33 is an annual bilateral exercise conducted with the Armed Forces of the Philippines that combines amphibious capabilities and live-fire training with humanitarian civic assistance efforts to strengthen interoperability and working relationships through commitment, capability and cooperation. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal/ Released)
Marines with Echo Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, land in Colonel Ernesto Ravina Air Base, Philippines, to begin bilateral training with their counterparts in the Philippine Marine Corps as part of Philippine Amphibious Landing Exercise 33 (PHIBLEX). PHIBLEX is an annual U.S.-Philippine military bilateral exercise that combines amphibious capabilities and live-fire training with humanitarian civic assistance efforts to strengthen interoperability and working relationships.(U.S. Navy photo by Ensign Rob Kunzig/Released)
Philippine, 2/4 Marine Conduct Bilateral Training
Marines with Echo Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, land in Colonel Ernesto Ravina Air Base, Philippines, to begin bilateral training with their counterparts in the Philippine Marine Corps as part of Philippine Amphibious Landing Exercise 33 (PHIBLEX). PHIBLEX is an annual U.S.-Philippine military bilateral exercise that combines amphibious capabilities and live-fire training with humanitarian civic assistance efforts to strengthen interoperability and working relationships.(U.S. Navy photo by Ensign Rob Kunzig/Released)
Cpl. Cristina Fuentes, a UH-1Y Venom helicopter crew chief assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fires a GAU-17/A minigun during a fire support training exercise (FISTEX) over Farallon De Medinilla, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Sept. 16, 2016. Marines with VMM-262 (Rein.) conducted the FISTEX as a part of Valiant Shield 16. Valiant Shield 16 is a biennial, U.S.-only, field training exercise with a focus on integration of joint training among U.S. forces. This training enables real-world proficiency in sustaining joint forces through detecting, locating, tracking and engaging units at sea, in the air, on land, and in cyberspace in response to a range of mission areas. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal/Released)
Spitting Venom
Cpl. Cristina Fuentes, a UH-1Y Venom helicopter crew chief assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fires a GAU-17/A minigun during a fire support training exercise (FISTEX) over Farallon De Medinilla, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Sept. 16, 2016. Marines with VMM-262 (Rein.) conducted the FISTEX as a part of Valiant Shield 16. Valiant Shield 16 is a biennial, U.S.-only, field training exercise with a focus on integration of joint training among U.S. forces. This training enables real-world proficiency in sustaining joint forces through detecting, locating, tracking and engaging units at sea, in the air, on land, and in cyberspace in response to a range of mission areas. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal/Released)
First Sgt. Mario Aguero sights in during Valiant Shield 26, at Apra Harbor, Guam, Sept. 20, 2016. Aguero is the company first sergeant of Company G, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines. Valiant Shield is a biennial U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps exercise held in Guam, focusing on real-world proficiency in sustaining joint forces at sea, in the air, on land and in cyberspace. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales)
Valiant Shield 16
First Sgt. Mario Aguero sights in during Valiant Shield 26, at Apra Harbor, Guam, Sept. 20, 2016. Aguero is the company first sergeant of Company G, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines. Valiant Shield is a biennial U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps exercise held in Guam, focusing on real-world proficiency in sustaining joint forces at sea, in the air, on land and in cyberspace. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales)
Sgt. Maj. Jim Lanham, sergeant major, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, speaks to a formation of 31st MEU noncommissioned officers on the flight-deck of the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) after taking part in physical training, Sept. 13. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and combines air-ground-logistics into a single team capable of addressing a range of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region – from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief in cooperation with host countries and partner militaries. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Staff Sgt. T.T. Parish/Released)
31st MEU NCOs gather for sergeant major PT
Sgt. Maj. Jim Lanham, sergeant major, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, speaks to a formation of 31st MEU noncommissioned officers on the flight-deck of the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) after taking part in physical training, Sept. 13. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and combines air-ground-logistics into a single team capable of addressing a range of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region – from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief in cooperation with host countries and partner militaries. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Staff Sgt. T.T. Parish/Released)
ABOARD USS BONHOMME RICHARD (LHD-6), At Sea, (Sept. 2, 2016) - Cpl. Taylor W. Torrence spends a moment with his partner, Eesther, in the hangar bay of the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6), while waiting to depart for a training mission as part of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, at sea, Sept. 2, 2016. 
 Torrence, a native of Fairfield, California, is a combat tracking-dog handler with the 31st MEU's Maritime Raid Force. Eesther is a four-year-old Belgian Malinois, and a combat tracking dog with the 31st MEU MRF. 
 The hangar bay is a common feature of amphibious assault ships, where Marines and Sailors maintain aircraft; troops gather before departing ship; and, occasionally, where the ship's crew go to get a breath of fresh air when the doors are open throughout the day. 
 The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and combines air-ground-logistics into a single team capable of addressing a range of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region – from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief in cooperation with host countries and partner militaries. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Staff Sgt. T.T. Parish/Released)
Hangar bay dog-day
ABOARD USS BONHOMME RICHARD (LHD-6), At Sea, (Sept. 2, 2016) - Cpl. Taylor W. Torrence spends a moment with his partner, Eesther, in the hangar bay of the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6), while waiting to depart for a training mission as part of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, at sea, Sept. 2, 2016. Torrence, a native of Fairfield, California, is a combat tracking-dog handler with the 31st MEU's Maritime Raid Force. Eesther is a four-year-old Belgian Malinois, and a combat tracking dog with the 31st MEU MRF. The hangar bay is a common feature of amphibious assault ships, where Marines and Sailors maintain aircraft; troops gather before departing ship; and, occasionally, where the ship's crew go to get a breath of fresh air when the doors are open throughout the day. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and combines air-ground-logistics into a single team capable of addressing a range of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region – from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief in cooperation with host countries and partner militaries. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Staff Sgt. T.T. Parish/Released)
Col. Tye R. Wallace, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit commanding officer, congratulates Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Ben Kaplan for his hard work and dedication to serving the Marines of Company G, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, aboard the USS Germantown (LSD-42), Sept. 23, 2016. As the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward deployed unit, the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit is prepared to respond to a wide range of military operations, from humanitarian assistance missions to limited combat operations, at a moment’s notice. As a balanced air-ground-logistics team, the 31st MEU is ready to respond throughout the Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales/released)
31st MEU commanding officer and sergeant major speak aboard USS Germantown
Col. Tye R. Wallace, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit commanding officer, congratulates Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Ben Kaplan for his hard work and dedication to serving the Marines of Company G, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, aboard the USS Germantown (LSD-42), Sept. 23, 2016. As the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward deployed unit, the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit is prepared to respond to a wide range of military operations, from humanitarian assistance missions to limited combat operations, at a moment’s notice. As a balanced air-ground-logistics team, the 31st MEU is ready to respond throughout the Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales/released)
U.S. Marines assigned to Company F, Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, maneuver with combat rubber raiding craft while participating in an amphibious night raid off the coast of Camp Courtney, Okinawa, Japan, Sept. 3, 2016. As the Marine Corps' force-in-readiness in the Asia-Pacific region, the 31st MEU trains in a number of unique capabilities for rapid crisis response. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
31st MEU Amphibious Raid
U.S. Marines assigned to Company F, Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, maneuver with combat rubber raiding craft while participating in an amphibious night raid off the coast of Camp Courtney, Okinawa, Japan, Sept. 3, 2016. As the Marine Corps' force-in-readiness in the Asia-Pacific region, the 31st MEU trains in a number of unique capabilities for rapid crisis response. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
USS GREEN BAY (LPD 20), At Sea, (Aug. 23, 2016) – A Marine Corps UH-1Y Venom "Huey" helicopter from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, takes-off from the flight deck of the USS Green Bay (LPD 20), at sea, Aug. 23, 2016. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and combines air-ground-logistics into a single team capable of addressing a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region, from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
31st MEU takes flight day and night
USS GREEN BAY (LPD 20), At Sea, (Aug. 23, 2016) – A Marine Corps UH-1Y Venom "Huey" helicopter from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, takes-off from the flight deck of the USS Green Bay (LPD 20), at sea, Aug. 23, 2016. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and combines air-ground-logistics into a single team capable of addressing a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region, from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
WHITE BEACH NAVAL STATION, Okinawa, Japan, (Sept. 4, 2016) – Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, carry a wounded role-player evacuated from the U.S. Consulate on Okinawa, Japan, during noncombatant evacuation operations training at White Beach Naval Station, Okinawa, Sept. 4, 2016. Noncombatant evacuation operations are a key facet of the 31st MEU’s capabilities as part of the Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group. The 31st MEU, currently embarked aboard the ships of the BHR ESG, combines air-ground-logistics into a single unit with one commander, and is task-organized to address a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region, from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales/released)
31st MEU Marines Conduct NEO Training Exercise
WHITE BEACH NAVAL STATION, Okinawa, Japan, (Sept. 4, 2016) – Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, carry a wounded role-player evacuated from the U.S. Consulate on Okinawa, Japan, during noncombatant evacuation operations training at White Beach Naval Station, Okinawa, Sept. 4, 2016. Noncombatant evacuation operations are a key facet of the 31st MEU’s capabilities as part of the Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group. The 31st MEU, currently embarked aboard the ships of the BHR ESG, combines air-ground-logistics into a single unit with one commander, and is task-organized to address a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region, from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales/released)
USS GREEN BAY (LPD-20), At Sea, (Aug. 29, 2016)– Marines assigned to Company F, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit use combat rubber raiding craft to conduct a launch and recovery exercise from the well deck of the USS Green Bay (LPD-20), at sea, Aug. 29, 2016. The 31st MEU is task-organized to address a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region, from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
"Raiders" launch from the sea
USS GREEN BAY (LPD-20), At Sea, (Aug. 29, 2016)– Marines assigned to Company F, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit use combat rubber raiding craft to conduct a launch and recovery exercise from the well deck of the USS Green Bay (LPD-20), at sea, Aug. 29, 2016. The 31st MEU is task-organized to address a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region, from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
ABOARD USS GREEN BAY (LPD-20), At Sea (Aug. 22, 2016) – U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Torien Collins, an aviation boatswain's mate, directs sailors away from a U.S. Marine Corps MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, on the flight deck of the USS Green Bay (LPD-20), at sea, Aug. 22, 2016. Marines of the 31st MEU are currently embarked on ships of the USS Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group for a regularly scheduled fall patrol of the Asia-Pacific region. The 31st MEU combines air-ground-logistics into a single unit with one commander, and is task-organized to address a range of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region, from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.  (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
Moving runway and tilting rotors aboard USS Green Bay (LPD-20)
ABOARD USS GREEN BAY (LPD-20), At Sea (Aug. 22, 2016) – U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Torien Collins, an aviation boatswain's mate, directs sailors away from a U.S. Marine Corps MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, on the flight deck of the USS Green Bay (LPD-20), at sea, Aug. 22, 2016. Marines of the 31st MEU are currently embarked on ships of the USS Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group for a regularly scheduled fall patrol of the Asia-Pacific region. The 31st MEU combines air-ground-logistics into a single unit with one commander, and is task-organized to address a range of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region, from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
ABOARD USS GERMANTOWN (LSD-42), At Sea, (Aug. 31,2016) – Marines and sailors with the USS Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group conduct a resupply mission aboard the USS Germantown (LSD-42). The resupply was done in support of the 31st MEU's fall patrol. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and combines air-ground-logistics into a single team capable of addressing a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region, from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales/released)
Marines, Sailors conduct resupply mission during 31st MEU's Fall Patrol
ABOARD USS GERMANTOWN (LSD-42), At Sea, (Aug. 31,2016) – Marines and sailors with the USS Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group conduct a resupply mission aboard the USS Germantown (LSD-42). The resupply was done in support of the 31st MEU's fall patrol. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and combines air-ground-logistics into a single team capable of addressing a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region, from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales/released)
ABOARD USS GERMANTOWN (LSD-42), At Sea (Aug. 21, 2016) - U.S. Marines with Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, riding Assault Amphibious Vehicles, boarded the USS Germantown (LSD-42) while underway as part of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group, Aug. 21, 2016. 
The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and is task-organized to address a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region, from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.  (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales/released)
Tracks, All Aboard and Underway
ABOARD USS GERMANTOWN (LSD-42), At Sea (Aug. 21, 2016) - U.S. Marines with Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, riding Assault Amphibious Vehicles, boarded the USS Germantown (LSD-42) while underway as part of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group, Aug. 21, 2016. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and is task-organized to address a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region, from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales/released)
ABOARD USS BONHOMME RICHARD (LHD-6), At Sea (Aug. 24, 2016) – An MV-22B Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, approaches the flight deck of the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6), during normal flight operations at sea, Aug. 24, 2016. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and is task-organized to address a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region – from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief in cooperation with host countries and partner militaries. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jay A. Parks/ Released)
VMM-262 Practices Low Light Landing Aboard BHR
ABOARD USS BONHOMME RICHARD (LHD-6), At Sea (Aug. 24, 2016) – An MV-22B Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, approaches the flight deck of the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6), during normal flight operations at sea, Aug. 24, 2016. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and is task-organized to address a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region – from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief in cooperation with host countries and partner militaries. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jay A. Parks/ Released)
ABOARD USS GERMANTOWN (LSD-42), At Sea (Aug. 21, 2016) - U.S. Marines with Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, riding Assault Amphibious Vehicles, boarded the USS Germantown (LSD-42) while underway as part of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group, Aug. 21, 2016. 
The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and is task-organized to address a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region, from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.  (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales/released)
Tracks, All Aboard and Underway
ABOARD USS GERMANTOWN (LSD-42), At Sea (Aug. 21, 2016) - U.S. Marines with Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, riding Assault Amphibious Vehicles, boarded the USS Germantown (LSD-42) while underway as part of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group, Aug. 21, 2016. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and is task-organized to address a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region, from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales/released)
U.S. Marine Corps Col. Tye R. Wallace addresses the Marines and Sailors assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit for the first time since setting sail on the USS Bonhomme Richard, at sea, in Japan on Aug. 22, 2016. The 31st MEU is currently underway and on patrol around the Asia-Pacific region. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and combines air-ground-logistics into a single team capable of addressing a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region – from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief in cooperation with host countries and partner militaries.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jay Parks, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
Formation At Sea
U.S. Marine Corps Col. Tye R. Wallace addresses the Marines and Sailors assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit for the first time since setting sail on the USS Bonhomme Richard, at sea, in Japan on Aug. 22, 2016. The 31st MEU is currently underway and on patrol around the Asia-Pacific region. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and combines air-ground-logistics into a single team capable of addressing a wide variety of military operations in the Asia-Pacific region – from force projection and maritime security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief in cooperation with host countries and partner militaries.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jay Parks, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
WHITE BEACH, Okinawa, Japan, (Aug. 20, 2016) – Marines with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit wait on the gangplank before boarding the USS Bonhomme Richard at White Beach, Okinawa, Japan, Aug. 20, 2016.
The 31st MEU is embarked aboard the ships of the Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group during a regularly scheduled patrol of the Pacific region.
Sea Bound, 31st MEU Goes Aboard BHR
WHITE BEACH, Okinawa, Japan, (Aug. 20, 2016) – Marines with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit wait on the gangplank before boarding the USS Bonhomme Richard at White Beach, Okinawa, Japan, Aug. 20, 2016. The 31st MEU is embarked aboard the ships of the Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group during a regularly scheduled patrol of the Pacific region.
Sgt. Maj. James Roberts, off-going sergeant major of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, relinquishes the sword of office during his relief and appointment ceremony and retirement ceremony to Col. Tye R. Wallace, commanding officer of the 31st MEU, and oncoming MEU Sgt. Maj. Jim Lanham, Aug. 10, 2016 at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan. Roberts retired after 30 years of service, completing his enlistment with a tour as sergeant major of the 31st MEU. The 31st MEU led several humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations across the Pacific region, as well as various bilateral and multilateral exercises with Pacific partner nations, during Roberts’ tenure as the 31st MEU’s senior enlisted advisor.
31st MEU Sergeant Major retires, Lanham assumes sword of office
Sgt. Maj. James Roberts, off-going sergeant major of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, relinquishes the sword of office during his relief and appointment ceremony and retirement ceremony to Col. Tye R. Wallace, commanding officer of the 31st MEU, and oncoming MEU Sgt. Maj. Jim Lanham, Aug. 10, 2016 at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan. Roberts retired after 30 years of service, completing his enlistment with a tour as sergeant major of the 31st MEU. The 31st MEU led several humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations across the Pacific region, as well as various bilateral and multilateral exercises with Pacific partner nations, during Roberts’ tenure as the 31st MEU’s senior enlisted advisor.
U.S. Marines with the Maritime Raid Force, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit clear a water treatment facility at Koror, Palau on July 21, 2016. The Marines are conducting training in Palau to ensure familiarity with Palau's complex urban environment. The training events were planned out with local authorities to provide an opportunity for realistic training with minimal inconvenience to the community and environment. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales/ Released)
Maritime Raid Force rushes in, Palau police provides security
U.S. Marines with the Maritime Raid Force, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit clear a water treatment facility at Koror, Palau on July 21, 2016. The Marines are conducting training in Palau to ensure familiarity with Palau's complex urban environment. The training events were planned out with local authorities to provide an opportunity for realistic training with minimal inconvenience to the community and environment. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jorge A. Rosales/ Released)
Marines with III Marine Expeditionary Force participated in a culminating event as part of a Marine Corps Martial Arts Program Instructor course July 28, 2016 at Camp Hansen in Okinawa, Japan. The Marines went through a three-week course which challenged them mentally and physically, pushing them past their limits. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Samantha Villarreal/Released)
Marines endure Marine Corps Martial Arts Program instructor course
Marines with III Marine Expeditionary Force participated in a culminating event as part of a Marine Corps Martial Arts Program Instructor course July 28, 2016 at Camp Hansen in Okinawa, Japan. The Marines went through a three-week course which challenged them mentally and physically, pushing them past their limits. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Samantha Villarreal/Released)
A Marine with Helo Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit trecks through the jungle June 25, 2016 at the Jungle Warfare Training Center in Okinawa, Japan during scenario based training. The training was part of Marine Expeditionary Unit Exercise in preparation for the 31st MEU's upcoming fall deployment (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Samantha Villarreal/Released)
31st MEU Marines conduct helo raid training exercise
A Marine with Helo Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit trecks through the jungle June 25, 2016 at the Jungle Warfare Training Center in Okinawa, Japan during scenario based training. The training was part of Marine Expeditionary Unit Exercise in preparation for the 31st MEU's upcoming fall deployment (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Samantha Villarreal/Released)
Marines with Helo Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit prepare to board MV-22B Ospreys as part of scenario based training in preparation for the 31st MEU's upcoming fall deployment June 25, 2016 at Camp Hansen in Okinawa, Japan.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Samantha Villarreal/Released)
31st MEU Marines conduct helo raid training exercise
Marines with Helo Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit prepare to board MV-22B Ospreys as part of scenario based training in preparation for the 31st MEU's upcoming fall deployment June 25, 2016 at Camp Hansen in Okinawa, Japan.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Samantha Villarreal/Released)
Marines from F Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, carry a combat rubber raid craft to the shore in preparation for nighttime raid operations at Kin Blue, Okinawa, Japan during scenario based training. The training was part of Marine Expeditionary Unit Exercise in preparation for the 31st MEU's upcoming fall deployment. The F Co., 2/4 Marines primary mission is to conduct amphibious landing and covert raid operations in support of the 31st MEU.
F Co. 2/4 conducts nighttime raid training during MEUEX
Marines from F Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, carry a combat rubber raid craft to the shore in preparation for nighttime raid operations at Kin Blue, Okinawa, Japan during scenario based training. The training was part of Marine Expeditionary Unit Exercise in preparation for the 31st MEU's upcoming fall deployment. The F Co., 2/4 Marines primary mission is to conduct amphibious landing and covert raid operations in support of the 31st MEU.
U.S. Marines and Japanese service members load supplies into MV-22B Osprey, assigned to the Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, in Japan Ground Self Defense Force Takayumaru Camp April 18, 2016. The supplies were in support of the relief effort after a series of earthquakes struck the island of Kyushu. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Samantha Villarreal)
Marines assist in Japan earthquake relief
U.S. Marines and Japanese service members load supplies into MV-22B Osprey, assigned to the Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, in Japan Ground Self Defense Force Takayumaru Camp April 18, 2016. The supplies were in support of the relief effort after a series of earthquakes struck the island of Kyushu. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Samantha Villarreal)
Marines and Japanese service members load supplies into MV-22B Ospreys with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit in Japan Ground Self Defense Force Takayumaru Camp April 18, 2016. The supplies are in support of the relief effort after a series of earthquakes struck the island of Kyushu. The 31st MEU is the only continually forward-deployed MEU and remains the Marine Corps' force-in-readiness in the Asia-Pacific region.
 (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Samantha Villarreal/Released)
Marines assisst in Japan earthquake relief
Marines and Japanese service members load supplies into MV-22B Ospreys with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit in Japan Ground Self Defense Force Takayumaru Camp April 18, 2016. The supplies are in support of the relief effort after a series of earthquakes struck the island of Kyushu. The 31st MEU is the only continually forward-deployed MEU and remains the Marine Corps' force-in-readiness in the Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Samantha Villarreal/Released)
U.S. Marine Cpl. Christopher Lee, with Alpha Company, Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, uses hand signals to communicate with other AAV-P7/A1 Amphibious Assault Vehicles while conducting a combined amphibious assault on Dogu Beach, South Korea, as part of Ssang Yong 16, March 12, 2016. Ssang Yong is a biennial combined amphibious exercise conducted by U.S. forces with the Republic of Korea Navy and Marine Corps, Australian Army and Royal New Zealand Army forces in order to strengthen interoperability and working relationships across a wide range of military operations. The Marines and sailors of the 31st MEU are in Korea as part of their spring deployment to the Asia-Pacific region. Lee, a native of Haslet, Texas, is a crew chief with Alpha Co., BLT 1/5,31st MEU. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Carl King Jr./Released)
Ssang Yong 16: 31st MEU Marines take to the water for amphibious assault
U.S. Marine Cpl. Christopher Lee, with Alpha Company, Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, uses hand signals to communicate with other AAV-P7/A1 Amphibious Assault Vehicles while conducting a combined amphibious assault on Dogu Beach, South Korea, as part of Ssang Yong 16, March 12, 2016. Ssang Yong is a biennial combined amphibious exercise conducted by U.S. forces with the Republic of Korea Navy and Marine Corps, Australian Army and Royal New Zealand Army forces in order to strengthen interoperability and working relationships across a wide range of military operations. The Marines and sailors of the 31st MEU are in Korea as part of their spring deployment to the Asia-Pacific region. Lee, a native of Haslet, Texas, is a crew chief with Alpha Co., BLT 1/5,31st MEU. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Carl King Jr./Released)
U.S. Marines with Alpha Company, Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, conduct a combined amphibious assault on Dogu Beach, South Korea, in AAV-P7/A1 Amphibious Assault Vehicles as part of Ssang Yong 16, March 12, 2016.  Ssang Yong is a biennial combined amphibious exercise conducted by U.S. forces with the Republic of Korea Navy and Marine Corps, Australian Army and Royal New Zealand Army Forces in order to strengthen interoperability and working relationships across a wide range of military operations. The Marines and Sailors of the 31st MEU are in Korea as part of their spring deployment to the Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Carl King Jr./Released)
Ssang Yong 16: 31st MEU Marines take to the water for amphibious assault
U.S. Marines with Alpha Company, Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, conduct a combined amphibious assault on Dogu Beach, South Korea, in AAV-P7/A1 Amphibious Assault Vehicles as part of Ssang Yong 16, March 12, 2016. Ssang Yong is a biennial combined amphibious exercise conducted by U.S. forces with the Republic of Korea Navy and Marine Corps, Australian Army and Royal New Zealand Army Forces in order to strengthen interoperability and working relationships across a wide range of military operations. The Marines and Sailors of the 31st MEU are in Korea as part of their spring deployment to the Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Carl King Jr./Released)
U.S. ships from the Boxer and Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Groups sail with the Dokdo Amphibious Ready Group from the Republic of Korea during Ssang Yong 2016, at sea, March 8, 2016. The U.S. Navy and Marine Corps team are committed to the ROK-U.S. alliance and conduct exercises regularly to ensure interoperability and maintain strong working relationships.  Ssang Yong familiarizes American armed forces with the Korean Peninsula and builds upon the strong preexisting relationship between the two militaries. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group Begins Exercise Ssang Yong 2016 in the Republic of Korea
U.S. ships from the Boxer and Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Groups sail with the Dokdo Amphibious Ready Group from the Republic of Korea during Ssang Yong 2016, at sea, March 8, 2016. The U.S. Navy and Marine Corps team are committed to the ROK-U.S. alliance and conduct exercises regularly to ensure interoperability and maintain strong working relationships. Ssang Yong familiarizes American armed forces with the Korean Peninsula and builds upon the strong preexisting relationship between the two militaries. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit/ Released)
What's new with the MEU
31st MEU completes fall patrol, returns to Okinawa By Cpl. Samantha Villarreal | November 6, 2016
31st MEU Marines learn lifesaving skills By Cpl. Samantha Villarreal | October 26, 2016
31st MEU completes PHIBLEX 33 By Cpl Samantha Villarreal | October 23, 2016
31st MEU Marines, AFP visit Crow Valley school, build ties By | October 8, 2016
31st MEU embarks on Fall Patrol 2016 By Sgt. Tiffany Edwards | August 21, 2016

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