31st Marine Expeditionary Unit

 

31st Marine Expeditionary Unit

Ready - Partnered - Lethal

Okinawa, Japan
Marines with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit patrol to the objective during a no-notice flyaway Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear response exercise on Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Oct. 31, 2019. The exercise demonstrated the MEU’s ability to conduct planning, insertion, execution, and retrograde at distances of up to 600 miles within 72 hours. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Kenny Nunez Bigay)
Marines with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit's Maritime Raid Force provide security during a no-notice flyaway Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear response exercise on Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Oct. 31, 2019. The CBRN exercise demonstrated the MEU’s ability to conduct planning, insertion, execution, and retrograde at distances of up to 600 miles within 72 hours. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Brennan Priest)
Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fill sand bags during an engineering training exercise at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Oct. 18, 2019. This training allowed CLB-31’s combat engineers to improve proficiency in building a forward operating base when operating in an austere environment. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps' only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)
Lance Cpl. Ashley Breed, a satellite communications operator with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, receives the Navy and Marine Corps achievement medal at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Oct. 4, 2019. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Kevan Dunlop)
PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 8, 2019) Marines and Sailors with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit have a guided discussion with Lt. Cmdr Jason Weatherwax, Chaplain with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, after “Chap’s Fit”, a daily workout and discussion group focusing on spiritual toughness, aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1). Wasp, flagship of the Wasp Amphibious Ready Group, with embarked 31st MEU, is operating in the Indo-Pacific region to enhance interoperability with partners and serve as ready-response force for any type of contingency, while simultaneously providing a flexible and lethal crisis response force ready to perform a wide range of military operations. (Official U.S Navy photo by RP3 Anthony Wood-Casella)
What's new with the MEU
Spiritual toughness: 31st MEU Chaplain provides daily workouts, wisdom aboard USS Wasp By 2nd Lt. Jonathan Coronel | September 9, 2019
Much more than beans, bullets and band-aids: CLB-31 provides more than just sustainment for 31st MEU By Lance Cpl. Kenny Nunezbigay | September 9, 2019
U.S. Marines complete simulated combined amphibious assault, reconnaissance raid in Bowen, Australia By Capt. George T. McArthur | September 9, 2019
Amphibious raids: 31st MEU Golf Company provides lethality from sea By Cpl. Brennan Priest | September 9, 2019
Wet ‘n Wild: The AAV platoon of the 31st MEU By Lance Cpl. Kyle Bunyi | September 9, 2019

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