31st Marine Expeditionary Unit

 

31st Marine Expeditionary Unit

Forward. Flexible. Ready.

Okinawa, Japan
Sergeant Maj. Edwin Mota, sergeant major of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, carries the unit guidon to Col. Tye R. Wallace during a change of command ceremony at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, June 13, 2018.
Wallace departs, Brodie assumes command of the 31st MEU
Sergeant Maj. Edwin Mota, sergeant major of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, carries the unit guidon to Col. Tye R. Wallace during a change of command ceremony at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, June 13, 2018. Colonel Robert Brodie assumed command from Wallace during the ceremony. Wallace, a graduate of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, led the 31st MEU through four deployments during his tenure, including the historic operational MEU deployment featuring the F-35B Lightning II fighter jet earlier in 2018. Brodie assumed command after recently serving at COL BRODIE PREVIOUS UNIT. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps' only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide-range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Gunnery Sgt. T. T. Parish/Released)
Colonel Robert Brodie, newly appointed commander of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, accepts the unit guidon from Col. Tye R. Wallace during a change of command ceremony at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, June 13, 2018.
Wallace departs, Brodie assumes command of the 31st MEU
Colonel Robert Brodie, newly appointed commander of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, accepts the unit guidon from Col. Tye R. Wallace during a change of command ceremony at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, June 13, 2018. Brodie assumed command after recently serving at 1st Air Force, 601st Air Operations Center. Wallace, a graduate of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, led the 31st MEU through four deployments during his tenure, including the historic operational MEU deployment featuring the F-35B Lightning II fighter jet earlier in 2018. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps' only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide-range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Gunnery Sgt. T. T. Parish/Released)
Noncommissioned officers with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit conduct star jumps during a Force Fitness Instructor led High Intensity Tactical Training session at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, June 8, 2018.
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Noncommissioned officers with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit conduct star jumps during a Force Fitness Instructor led High Intensity Tactical Training session at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, June 8, 2018. The 31st MEU is adopting an NCO-led FFI program to improve overall physical fitness while reducing injury and building unit morale. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps' only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide-range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Gunnery Sgt. T. T. Parish/Released)
A Marine with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, provides security at the Jungle Warfare Training Center, at Camp Gonsalves, Okinawa, Japan, May 22, 2018.
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A Marine with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, provides security at the Jungle Warfare Training Center, at Camp Gonsalves, Okinawa, Japan, May 22, 2018. During the training, Marines and Sailors with the battalion learned essential jungle survival skills in order to better support operations in the Indo-Pacific region. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps' only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide-range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Kealii De Los Santos/Released)
Marines with Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, load onto busses headed to Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, May 18, 2018.
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Marines with Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, load onto busses headed to Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, May 18, 2018. BLT 2/5 will be taking up the role as the Ground Combat Element of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward deployed MEU, provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Matt Navarra/Released)
Capt. Juan Itturiaga, a supply officer with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, explains embarking procedures to Japan Ground Self-Defense Force service members during an amphibious warfare exercise at Camp Ainoura, Sasebo, Japan, May 16, 2018.
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Capt. Juan Itturiaga, a supply officer with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, explains embarking procedures to Japan Ground Self-Defense Force service members during an amphibious warfare exercise at Camp Ainoura, Sasebo, Japan, May 16, 2018. Marines and Sailors with CLB-31, joined the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force service members to embark with the newly formed Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade to enhance the ARDB’s capabilities to deal with various situations on islands. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Hannah Hall/Released)
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The Marines and Sailors of Combat Logistics Battalion 31 conduct a motivation run for battalion physical training at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, April 4, 2018. The battalion conducted PT to build morale and unit cohesion while also increasing Marines' stamina. In order to maintain the readiness of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, every Marine and Sailor within CLB-31 must be physically and mentally prepared to respond to any contingency in the Indo-Pacific region at a moment’s notice. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward deployed MEU, provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Matt Navarra/Released)
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CLB-31 Marines participate in combat engineering field exercise
Sgt. Charles Herndon (center) and Cpl. Christopher Moncrief (right), both combat engineers with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, simulate building a classroom during a combat engineering field exercise at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, May 10, 2018. CLB-31 took part in the training to give it’s junior Marines an opportunity to complete a project from the ground up. CLB-31 is the the Logistics Combat Element of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Alexis B. Betances/Released)
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31st MEU maintain equipment and readiness
Marines with Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, inspect the engine of a Humvee during maintenance stand-down on Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, May 9, 2018. During this maintenance stand-down, Marines inspected serviced and maintained all of the equipment the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit used on spring patrol 2018. The 31st MEU, including CLB-31, the Logistics Combat Element for the MEU, returned to Okinawa, April 21, after a regularly scheduled patrol of the Indo-Pacific region. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward deployed MEU, provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Matt Navarra/Released)
Col. Tye R. Wallace, commanding officer of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, right, salutes the flag alongside past and present sergeant majors of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit during a post and relief ceremony at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, April 27, 2018.
31st MEU sergeant major relinquishes sword of office, Mota assumes duties
Col. Tye R. Wallace, commanding officer of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, right, salutes the flag alongside past and present sergeant majors of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit during a post and relief ceremony at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, April 27, 2018. Sgt. Maj. Jim Lanham relinquished the sword to Sgt. Maj. Edwin Mota during the ceremony. Mota assumed duties as the 31st MEU sergeant major after leaving 2nd Raider Battalion and Lanham is slated to assume duties as sergeant major of 12th Marine Corps District at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, California, During Lanham’s tenure, the 31st MEU supported several exercises across the Indo-Pacific region, including Philippines Amphibious Landing Exercise, Exercise Cobra Gold in Thailand and Exercise Talisman Saber in Australia. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Amy Phan/Released)
Ziva, a military working dog with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, executes routine aggression tactics on the USS Wasp (LHD-1) while underway in the Pacific Ocean, April 8, 2018.
They’ll ruff you up: working dogs conduct training on the USS Wasp
Ziva, a military working dog with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, executes routine aggression tactics on the USS Wasp (LHD-1) while underway in the Pacific Ocean, April 8, 2018. The 31st MEU uses military working dogs and their handlers for protection and aggression in order to disarm and take down targets when needed. As the Marine Corps' only continuously forward-deployed MEU, the 31st MEU provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bernadette Wildes/Released)
Marines and Sailors do jumping jacks on the flight deck of the USS Wasp (LHD-1) during Sgt. Maj. PT while underway in the Philippine Sea, April 11, 2018.
Marines and Sailors PT on the flight deck of the USS Wasp
Marines and Sailors do jumping jacks on the flight deck of the USS Wasp (LHD-1) during Sgt. Maj. PT while underway in the Philippine Sea, April 11, 2018. While underway, Marines and Sailors aboard the Wasp take advantage of the open flight deck to improve their physical fitness. The 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit partners with the Navy’s Amphibious Squadron 11 to form the Wasp Amphibious Ready Group, a cohesive blue-green team capable of accomplishing a variety of missions across the Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bernadette Wildes/Released)
Sgt. Maj. Jim Lanham, the sergeant major of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, talks to Marines and Sailors on the flight deck of the USS Wasp (LHD-1) after Sgt. Maj. PT while underway in the Philippine Sea, April 11, 2018.
Marines and Sailors PT on the flight deck of the USS Wasp
Sgt. Maj. Jim Lanham, the sergeant major of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, talks to Marines and Sailors on the flight deck of the USS Wasp (LHD-1) after Sgt. Maj. PT while underway in the Philippine Sea, April 11, 2018. While underway, Marines and Sailors aboard the Wasp take advantage of the open flight deck to improve their physical fitness. The 31st MEU partners with the Navy’s Amphibious Squadron 11 to form the Wasp Amphibious Ready Group, a cohesive blue-green team capable of accomplishing a variety of missions across the Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bernadette Wildes/Released)
Duece, a military working dog with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, bites a simulated threat on the USS Wasp (LHD-1) while underway in the Pacific Ocean, April 8, 2018.
They’ll ruff you up: working dogs conduct training on the USS Wasp
Duece, a military working dog with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, bites a simulated threat on the USS Wasp (LHD-1) while underway in the Pacific Ocean, April 8, 2018. The 31st MEU uses military working dogs and their handlers for protection and aggression in order to disarm and take down targets when needed. As the Marine Corps' only continuously forward-deployed MEU, the 31st MEU provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bernadette Wildes/Released)
Service members with the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force fast rope from a CH-47 Chinook at Camp Ainoura, Japan, April 7, 2018.
BLT 1/1 Marines work alongside JGSDF during Japanese Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade’s unit-activation ceremony
Service members with the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force fast rope from a CH-47 Chinook at Camp Ainoura, Japan, April 7, 2018. The 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit supported the ceremony with a fast rope demonstration from a CH-53E Super Stallion. As the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, the 31st MEU provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations throughout the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Amy Phan/Released)
Service members with the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force stand in formation during the Japanese Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade’s unit-activation ceremony at Camp Ainoura, Japan, April 7, 2018.
BLT 1/1 Marines work alongside JGSDF during Japanese Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade’s unit-activation ceremony
Service members with the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force stand in formation during the Japanese Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade’s unit-activation ceremony at Camp Ainoura, Japan, April 7, 2018. The 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit supported the ceremony with a fast rope demonstration from a CH-53E Super Stallion. As the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, the 31st MEU provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations throughout the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Amy Phan/Released)
A Marine with Weapons Company, Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, fast ropes off a CH-53E Super Stallion at Camp Ainoura, Japan, April 5, 2018.
BLT 1/1 Marines conduct fast rope rehearsals with the JGSDF
A Marine with Weapons Company, Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, fast ropes off a CH-53E Super Stallion at Camp Ainoura, Japan, April 5, 2018. BLT 1/1, the Ground Combat Element of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, conducts ground operations in support of the 31st MEU. The 31st MEU rehearsed alongside the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force for the Japanese Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade’s stand-up ceremony. As the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, the 31st MEU provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations throughout the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Amy Phan/Released)
Service members with the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force train at Camp Ainoura, Japan, April 5, 2018.
BLT 1/1 Marines conduct fast rope rehearsals with the JGSDF
Service members with the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force train at Camp Ainoura, Japan, April 5, 2018. The 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit rehearsed alongside the JGSDF for the Japanese Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade’s stand-up ceremony. As the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, the 31st MEU provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations throughout the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Amy Phan/Released)
Maj. Charles St. George, a pilot with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), speaks with a service member with the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force during rehearsals at Camp Ainoura, Japan, April 5, 2018.
BLT 1/1 Marines conduct fast rope rehearsals with the JGSDF
Maj. Charles St. George, a pilot with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), speaks with a service member with the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force during rehearsals at Camp Ainoura, Japan, April 5, 2018. VMM-265 (Rein.), part of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit’s Aviation Combat Element, provides assault transport, close air support and aviation command and control for the 31st MEU. The 31st MEU rehearsed alongside the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force for the Japanese Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade’s stand-up ceremony. As the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, the 31st MEU provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations throughout the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Amy Phan/Released)
Service members with the Japanese Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade show their capabilities during the ARDB’s unit-activation ceremony at Camp Ainoura, Japan, April 7, 2018.
BLT 1/1 Marines conduct fast rope rehearsals with the JGSDF
Service members with the Japanese Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade show their capabilities during the ARDB’s unit-activation ceremony at Camp Ainoura, Japan, April 7, 2018. The 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit supported the ceremony with a fast rope demonstration from a CH-53E Super Stallion. As the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, the 31st MEU provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations throughout the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Amy Phan/Released)
CWO2 Samuel Beltram, an Explosive Ordnance Disposal officer with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, relays a message through his radio while conducting a mock EOD sweep aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1) while underway in the Pacific Ocean, April 3, 2018.
31st MEU EOD technicians practice IED sweep
CWO2 Samuel Beltram, an Explosive Ordnance Disposal officer with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, relays a message through his radio while conducting a mock EOD sweep aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1) while underway in the Pacific Ocean, April 3, 2018. The mock EOD sweep was to ensure Marines’ readiness to properly detect and dispose of suspected improvised explosive devices. The 31st MEU partners with the Navy’s Amphibious Squadron 11 to form the Wasp Amphibious Ready Group, a cohesive blue-green team capable of accomplishing a variety of missions across the Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Kristiana Gehly)
CWO2 Samuel Beltram, an Explosive Ordnance Disposal officer with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, adjusts his helmet as he prepares for a mock EOD sweep aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1) while underway in the Pacific Ocean, April 3, 2018.
31st MEU EOD technicians practice IED sweep
CWO2 Samuel Beltram, an Explosive Ordnance Disposal officer with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, adjusts his helmet as he prepares for a mock EOD sweep aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1) while underway in the Pacific Ocean, April 3, 2018. The mock EOD sweep was to ensure Marines’ readiness to properly detect and dispose of suspected improvised explosive devices. The 31st MEU partners with the Navy’s Amphibious Squadron 11 to form the Wasp Amphibious Ready Group, a cohesive blue-green team capable of accomplishing a variety of missions across the Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Kristiana Gehly)
Marines with Weapons Company, Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, prepare to board an MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft after tactical recovery of aircraft and personnel training at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, March 26, 2018.
Marines with BLT 1/1 participate in TRAP training
Marines with Weapons Company, Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, prepare to board an MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft after tactical recovery of aircraft and personnel training at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, March 26, 2018. TRAP training prepares Marines to tactically recover personnel, equipment, or aircraft by inserting the recovery force to their location. As the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, the 31st MEU provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Amy Phan/Released)
An MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft flies overhead during tactical recovery of aircraft and personnel training at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, March 26, 2018.
Marines with BLT 1/1 participate in TRAP training
An MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft flies overhead during tactical recovery of aircraft and personnel training at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, March 26, 2018. TRAP training prepares Marines to tactically recover personnel, equipment, or aircraft by inserting the recovery force to their location. As the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, the 31st MEU provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Amy Phan/Released)
Gunnery Sgt. Michael Hornack, the company gunnery sergeant for Alpha Company, Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, exits an MRZR Tactical Warfighting all-terrain vehicle during a helo-borne raid during Amphibious Integration Training on Ie Shima, Okinawa, Japan, March 26, 2018.
Alpha Co. conducts helo-borne raid on Ie Shima Island
Gunnery Sgt. Michael Hornack, the company gunnery sergeant for Alpha Company, Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, exits an MRZR Tactical Warfighting all-terrain vehicle during a helo-borne raid during Amphibious Integration Training on Ie Shima, Okinawa, Japan, March 26, 2018. BLT 1/1 is the Ground Combat Element of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. The 31st MEU and Amphibious Squadron 11 conduct AIT in preparation for Certification Exercise and to ensure readiness for crisis response throughout the Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bernadette Wildes/Released)
What's new with the MEU
Wallace departs, Brodie assumes command of the 31st MEU By Gunnery Sgt. T. T. Parish | June 13, 2018
31st MEU Marines, Sailors HITT the field with Force Fitness Instructors By Gunnery Sgt. T. T. Parish | June 8, 2018
VMM-262 (Rein.) joins the 31st MEU By Lance Cpl. Alexis Betances | June 5, 2018
Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade sets sail By Lance Cpl. Hannah Hall | May 24, 2018
“Retreat, Hell!” Marines land in Okinawa By Lance Cpl. Matthew Navarra | May 21, 2018

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