Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), scan role-players posing as non-combatant evacuees for unauthorized items during simulated non-combatant evacuation operation at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, July 23, 2020.
SOUTH CHINA SEA (Sept. 6, 2020) Reconnaissance Marines with the Maritime Raid Force, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) conduct a visit, board, search and seizure rehearsal.
Marines with Combined Anti-Armor Team 1 (CAAT), Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), clean the beach at Kin Blue, Okinawa, Japan, July 25, 2020. At the conclusion of their training, CAAT-1 picked up trash that had washed up on the beach in order to leave the environment better than they found it. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. The 31st MEU has implemented strict health protection measures and will continue to conduct mission essential training in support of regional security and stability. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Kolby Leger)
Marines with Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), set up security during Tactical Recovery of Aircraft and Personnel (TRAP) training at Camp Futenma, Okinawa, Japan, July 1, 2020. Simulated TRAP missions allow Marines to rehearse realistic scenarios to improve their proficiency in recovering personnel and aircraft. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brienna Tuck)
Lance Cpl. Benjamin Carr, a tiltrotor crew chief with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fires an M240 machine gun during a training exercise at a tail gun range off the coast of Okinawa, Japan, July 30, 2020. The training consisted of field carrier landing practice and live firing from an MV-22B Osprey Tiltrotor aircraft. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. The 31st MEU has implemented strict health protection measures and will continue to conduct mission essential training in support of regional security and stability. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brienna Tuck)
Lance Cpl Jon Marie Roth, an administrative specialist with Combat Logistic Battalion (CLB) 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), lays on a stretcher while posing as a combat casualty during a nightingale exercise at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, July 29, 2020. During a nightingale, Marines and Sailors provide tactical combat casualty care and evacuation of combat casualties. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. The 31st MEU has implemented strict health protection measures and will continue to conduct mission essential training in support of regional security and stability. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Audrey M.C. Rampton)
A Force Reconnaissance Marine with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit’s (MEU) Maritime Raid Force dives out of a KC-130J Hercules with Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 152, during free fall training at le Jima, Okinawa, Japan, July 30, 2020. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. The 31st MEU has implemented strict health protection measures and will continue to conduct mission essential training in support of regional security and stability. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Joshua Brittenham)
Lance Cpl. Darrek Proctor, a machine gunner with Charlie Company, Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), practices marksmanship fundamentals from the seated position on Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, May 7, 2020. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps' only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Andrew R. Bray)
SOUTH CHINA SEA (April 18, 2020) An F-35B Lightning II fighter aircraft with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), prepares to land on the flight deck of amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) during flight operations. Marines and Sailors aboard the America regularly conduct flight operations while underway to maintain their readiness to respond to contingencies. America, flagship of the America Expeditionary Strike Group, 31st MEU team, is operating in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations to enhance interoperability with allies and partners and serve as a ready response force to defend peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Audrey M. C. Rampton)
Marines with Company E, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines run to board a MV22B Osprey during aviation integration training at Futenma Air Station, Okinawa, Japan, June 29, 2020. The training was conducted with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262, Reinforced, to increase Interoperability (Interop) training. Interop enhances coordination and familiarizes subordinate elements with the unique mission set of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU). The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Dominic Clay)
Col. Michael Nakonieczny, left, the oncoming commanding officer of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) and native of Buena Park, California, and Col. Robert Brodie, the departing commanding officer of the 31st MEU and a native of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, stand in front of the U.S. and unit colors at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, June 25, 2020. During Brodie’s two years in command of the 31st MEU, the unit completed four full unit-deployment cycles including training, exercises, and real-world operations throughout the Indo-Pacific region. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps' only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Audrey M. C. Rampton)
Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion (CLB) 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), attach a tire load to an MV22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced) during a helicopter support team (HST) training exercise at Kin Blue, Okinawa, Japan, June 18, 2020. The HST training was conducted to increase proficiencies in logistics tasks and enhance the ability to execute external lifts.
Lance Cpl. Carl Vanpetten, a military working dog handler with 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion (LEB), and Corado, a military working dog, patrol during a training exercise at Kin Blue, Okinawa, Japan, June 11, 2020. Corado is a patrol explosion detection dog (PEDD). PEDDs are used for their scouting abilities to sniff out explosives during patrols.
An Amphibious Reconnaissance Marine with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit checks another Marine’s gear prior to conducting hydrographic surveying for ship-to-shore operations on Camp Schwab, Okinawa, Japan, June 22, 2020.
Amy Fisher, one of the women who helped make masks for the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) Marines, sews masks at Camp Butler, Okinawa, Japan, April 24, 2020. Twelve women prepared 228 masks, spending 230 hours shopping for material, then cutting, sewing and assembling the masks for the Marines. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps' only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (Courtesy photo by Kristen Brodie)
A Force Reconnaissance Marine with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit’s Maritime Raid Force draws his M45A1 service pistol during a modified qualification as part of a close-quarters tactics range on Camp Hansen, Okinawa, May 11, 2020. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (Official U.S Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Isaac Cantrell)
PHILIPPINE SEA (Feb. 4, 2020) Cpl. Andrew Richter, a military working dog handler, and Jack-Jack, a military working dog, with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit’s (MEU) Maritime Raid Force provide security for their fellow Marines during a visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) full mission profile aboard the Whidbey Island-class dock landing ship USS Germantown (LSD 42). VBSS incorporates air, ground and surface combat assets from across the Blue-Green team to quickly interdict adversary ships at sea. Germantown, part of the America Expeditionary Strike Group, 31st MEU team, is operating in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations to enhance interoperability with allies and partners and serve as a ready response force to defend peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Joshua Sechser)
Cpl. Michael Cenci (middle left), a force reconnaissance Marine with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit's Maritime Raid Force and a native of Malvern, Pennsylvania, holds a Reconnaissance Foundation flag at Hat Yao, Kingdom of Thailand, March 5, 2020, following the completion of Exercise Cobra Gold 2020. Cobra Gold 20 was the largest theater security cooperation exercise in the Indo-Pacific region and an integral part of the U.S. commitment to strengthen engagement in the region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Isaac Cantrell)
SOUTH CHINA SEA (April 21, 2020) Marines with Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), load onto an MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), during a combat mission rehearsal aboard amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6). The Osprey is a long-range troop transport aircraft that can be deployed at a moment’s notice, enabling the Blue-Green team to rapidly respond to crises. America, flagship of the America Expeditionary Strike Group, 31st MEU team, is operating in the U.S 7th Fleet area of operations to enhance interoperability with allies and partners and serve as a ready response force to defend peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (Marine Corps photo by Sgt Audrey M. C. Rampton)
SOUTH CHINA SEA (April 18, 2020) An F-35B Lightning II fighter aircraft with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), prepares to land on the flight deck of amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) during flight operations. Marines and Sailors aboard the America regularly conduct flight operations while underway to maintain their readiness to respond to contingencies. America, flagship of the America Expeditionary Strike Group, 31st MEU team, is operating in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations to enhance interoperability with allies and partners and serve as a ready response force to defend peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Audrey M. C. Rampton)
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