Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion (CLB) 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), move an evacuee role-player onto a stretcher during a noncombatant evacuation operation (NEO) rehearsal that took place after a simulated embassy reinforcement at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Dec. 12, 2020. A NEO is the evacuation of civilians and nonessential military personnel from danger in an overseas country to a designated safe haven.
U.S. Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) observe a Marine CH-53E Super Stallion aircraft assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, carrying a Joint Light Tactical Vehicle Heavy Guns Carrier during a Helicopter Support Team (HST) training exercise as part of MEU Exercise at Kin Blue, Okinawa, Japan on Dec. 17, 2020. HST training is conducted to increase proficiency in logistics tasks and enhance the ability to execute potential contingency missions carried out by the 31st MEU. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premiere crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Colton Nicks)
Marines with Kilo Company, BLT 3/4, 31st MEU prepare for a night boat raid during MEU Exercise at Kin Red, Okinawa, Japan, Dec. 16, 2020.
Marines with CLB-31, 31st MEU rehearse a simulated foreign humanitarian assistance mission during MEU Exercise in Okinawa, Japan, Dec. 10, 2020.
Marines with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit drive a Polaris MRZR light tactical all-terrain vehicles onto an MV-22B Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Dec. 8, 2020. The Marines conducted the training in order to demonstrate and enhance insertion and extraction capabilities. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brienna Tuck)
Sgt. John James, a motor vehicle operator with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), is awarded the Navy Achievement Medal for saving Tokiko Ahuso, a local Kin Town resident who was bitten by a habu viper on Nov. 6, at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Dec 23, 2020. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Brandon Salas)
Using lifesaving skills he learned from the Marine Corps, Sgt. John James from Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) was able to save a local elderly woman from a venomous snake bite on Nov. 6, 2020. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region.
PHILIPPINE SEA (Sept. 22, 2020) Marines with Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), prepare to conduct a night shoot aboard USS New Orleans (LPD 18). New Orleans, part of Expeditionary Strike Group Seven (ESG 7), along with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, is operating in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility to enhance interoperability with allies and partners and serve as a ready response force to defend peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Joshua Brittenham)
EAST CHINA SEA (Sept. 21, 2020) A U.S. Navy Sailor embarked on dock landing ship USS Germantown (LSD 42) and a Marine with Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) operate a M2 .50-caliber Browning machine gun during a crew served weapons shoot. Germantown, part of Expeditionary Strike Group Seven (ESG 7), along with the 31st MEU, is operating in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility to enhance interoperability with allies and partners and serve as a ready response force to defend peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Danny Gonzalez)
PHILIPPINE SEA (Sept. 27, 2020) U.S. Marine Capt. William Cooper, a pilot with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 262 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) and native of Los Alamos, New Mexico, goes over a checklist before dropping illumination flares from an MV-22B Osprey after taking from amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6).
PHILIPPINE SEA (Aug. 24, 2020) Staff Sgt. Jack Hubbard, a radio technician with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), observes a 3D printer as it prints an equipment part used aboard USS New Orleans (LPD 18).
1st Lt. Alex Cervantes, a field artillery officer with Fox Company, Battalion Landing Team (BLT), 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), from Corona, California, graduated May of 2018 from the University of Notre Dame with a Bachelor’s of Science in Aerospace Engineering before deciding to join the Marines. He commissioned in June 2018, his very first salute to his father, Benny Cervantez, who served from 1984-1992. Cervantez is currently serving with the 31st MEU aboard USS New Orleans (LPD 18).
PHILIPPINE SEA (Sept. 17, 2020) 1st Lt. Rio Sarmiento, assigned to the 16th Space Control Squadron (SPCS), was administered the oath of office into the United States Space Force by U.S. Marine Col. Michael Nakonieczny, commanding officer of the 31st MEU, aboard amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6). Sarmiento was transferred from being an Air Force Space Operations Officer to becoming the first Space Force Liaison Officer (LNO) deployed with the 31st MEU. America, flagship of the America Expeditionary Strike Group, 31st MEU team, is operating in the U.S. 7th fleet area of operations to enhance interoperability with allies and partners and serve as a ready response force to defend peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brienna Tuck)
TRAP is the capability to conduct overland rescue and recovery of downed aircraft personnel, equipment, and to provide advanced trauma life support in a benign or hostile environment.
PHILIPPINE SEA (Sept. 9, 2020) A Marine with the Amphibious Reconnaissance Platoon, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), climbs down a caving ladder to board a rigid-hull inflatable boat from the amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) to conduct a reconnaissance and surveillance training mission in preparation for a boat raid.
SOUTH CHINA SEA (Sep. 6, 2020) An MV-22B Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), flies past amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) during a communication exercise.
PHIILIPPINE SEA (Sept. 11, 2020) Marines with Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) debark USS New Orleans (LPD 18) during a boat raid exercise.
Marines and Sailors with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit transport simulated casualties during a mass casualty drill, or Nightingale, aboard amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) in the Philippine Sea, Sept. 10, 2020.
An MV-22B Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced) prepares to take off from amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) in the Philippine Sea, Aug. 25, 2020.
PHILIPPINE SEA (Aug. 23, 2020) Marines with the Maritime Raid Force (MRF), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), fast rope out of a MV-22B Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, aboard amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6).
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