31st MEU Media Gallery
A U.S. Marine with Alpha Company, Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, sets security in front of an assault amphibious vehicle during an amphibious assault rehearsal for Cobra Gold 2020 at Hat Yao Beach, Kingdom of Thailand, Feb. 27, 2020. Exercise Cobra Gold 20, in its 39th iteration, is designed to advance regional security and ensure effective responses to regional crises by bringing together multinational forces to address shared goals and security commitments in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Audrey M. C. Rampton)
A Royal Thai Marine showcases a cobra to U.S. Marines with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit during jungle survival training at Camp Lotawin, Kingdom of Thailand, March 4, 2020, as part of exercise Cobra Gold 2020. Exercise Cobra Gold 20, in its 39th iteration, is designed to advance regional security and ensure effective responses to regional crises by bringing together multinational forces to address shared goals and security commitments in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Isaac Cantrell)
PACIFIC OCEAN (March 3, 2020) Sgt. Raymond Ramirez, a section leader, supervises Lance Cpl. Jerry Vanzuuk, an assault man, both with Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), while conducting a mounted machine gun range on a Joint Light Tactical Vehicle aboard the Whidbey Island-class dock landing ship USS Germantown. Germantown, part of the America Expeditionary Strike Group, 31st MEU team, is operating in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations to enhance interoperability with allies and partners and serve as a ready response force to defend peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Joshua Sechser)
A Royal Thai Marine fires a Shoulder-Launched Multipurpose Assault Weapon during exercise Cobra Gold 2020 at Ban Chan Krem, Chanthaburi, Kingdom of Thailand, March 5, 2020. Exercise Cobra Gold 20, in its 39th iteration, is designed to advance regional security and ensure effective responses to regional crises by bringing together multinational forces to address shared goals and security commitments in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Kolby Leger)
U.S. Marines with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and Royal Thai Marines jump out of the back of a CH-53 Super Stallion helicopter with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 265 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, during helocast training in Hat Yao, Kingdom of Thailand, March 5, 2020, as part of exercise Cobra Gold 2020. Exercise Cobra Gold 20, in its 39th iteration, is designed to advance regional security and ensure effective responses to regional crises by bringing together multinational forces to address shared goals and security commitments in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Isaac Cantrell)
Lance Cpl. Ashley Breed, a satellite communications operator with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, receives the Navy and Marine Corps achievement medal at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Oct. 4, 2019. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region.
Marines with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit's Maritime Raid Force provide security during a no-notice flyaway Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear response exercise on Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Oct. 31, 2019.
Marines with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit patrol to the objective during a no-notice flyaway Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear response exercise on Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Oct. 31, 2019.
Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fill sand bags during an engineering training exercise at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Oct. 18, 2019.
PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 8, 2019) Marines and Sailors with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit have a guided discussion with Lt. Cmdr Jason Weatherwax, Chaplain with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, after “Chap’s Fit”, a daily workout and discussion group focusing on spiritual toughness, aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1). Wasp, flagship of the Wasp Amphibious Ready Group, with embarked 31st MEU, is operating in the Indo-Pacific region to enhance interoperability with partners and serve as ready-response force for any type of contingency, while simultaneously providing a flexible and lethal crisis response force ready to perform a wide range of military operations. (Official U.S Navy photo by RP3 Anthony Wood-Casella)
“We cross-train Marines in every aspect of combat logistics, preparing them for the field and for any situation because when you’re a Marine, you are able to adapt and overcome,” said Corporal Christian Gomez, a supply specialist with CLB-31.
U.S. Marines conduct a simulated amphibious assault of exercise Talisman Sabre 19 in Bowen, Australia, July 22, 2019. Talisman Sabre provides an opportunity to conduct operations in a combined, joint and interagency environment that will increase participating countries' abilities to plan and execute contingency responses, from combat missions to humanitarian assistance efforts. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Tanner D. Lambert)
An Assault Amphibious Vehicle with Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, patrols the coast after a simulated raid on Townshend Island, Queensland Australia, July 1, 2019. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Kyle P. Bunyi)
Marines with Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, ride ashore in a Combat Rubber Raiding Craft during a boat raid exercise in the Coral Sea, July 3, 2019. The Marines launched from the amphibious dock landing ship USS Ashland (LSD 48), part of the Wasp Amphibious Ready Group, with embarked 31st MEU, while operating in the Indo-Pacific region to enhance interoperability with partners and serve as a ready-response force for any type of contingency, while simultaneously providing a flexible and lethal crisis response force ready to perform a wide range of military operations. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Brennan Priest)
Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, is comprised of various units, task organized to accomplish the different missions the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit is expected to be prepared for. One of the most versatile and dynamic capabilities that 2/1 offers would be the ability to vertically envelop the enemy and conduct offensive operations to seize, occupy and defend an objective. This is the job of Echo Company, tasked as BLT 2/1, 31st MEU’s Air Assault Company, currently deployed aboard the USS Wasp (LHD 1), as they take part in Talisman Sabre 2019, a biennial exercise between the U.S. and Australia.
Marines from the Marine Air Traffic Control Mobile Team stand alongside their Tactical Aid to Navigation device, which helps them guide incoming aircraft into the landing zone. Being able to rapidly set up and maintain airstrips and helipads in a deployed environment is one of the many capabilities that Detachment 18 brings to the 31st MEU.
“The capabilities and resourcefulness of the Marines in each of the individual platoons have developed and grown,” said 1st Lt. Michael Downing, Light Armored Reconnaissance platoon commander with Weapons Company. “Even in the restricted training environment on ship, seeing their drive to keep up the training in Weapons Company has been a very rewarding experience. We are excited to showcase all of our capabilities during Talisman Sabre and see all of our Marines’ hard work pay off.”
Sgt. Arielle Lahtinen, noncommissioned officer in charge with the 31st MEU's Law Enforcement detachment, tases a Marine with a Conducted Energy Weapon, or TASER, during a non-lethal weapons course aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1), underway in the Coral Sea, June 30, 2019. (Official Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Cameron Parks)
An F-35B Lightning II fighter aircraft with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, loaded with a Joint Direct Attack Munition and a laser guided bomb, prepares to take off during an aerial gunnery and ordnance hot-reloading exercise aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1), Solomon Sea, August 4, 2019. Wasp, flagship of the Wasp Amphibious Ready Group, with embarked 31st MEU, is operating in the Indo-Pacific region to enhance interoperability with partners and serve as ready-response force for any type of contingency, while simultaneously providing a flexible and lethal crisis response force ready to perform a wide range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Dylan Hess)
Ordnance Marines with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, load an AIM- 9X Sidewinder missile onto an F-35B Lightning II fighter aircraft prior to a defensive combat air patrol rehearsal aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1), Pacific Ocean, August 7, 2019. Wasp, flagship of the Wasp Amphibious Ready Group, with embarked 31st MEU, is operating in the Indo-Pacific region to enhance interoperability with partners and serve as ready-response force for any type of contingency, while simultaneously providing a flexible and lethal crisis response force ready to perform a wide range of military operations. (Official U.S Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Luis Velez)
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31st Marine Expeditionary Unit

 

31st Marine Expeditionary Unit

Ready - Partnered - Lethal

Okinawa, Japan