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Archive: September, 2013
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Marines with Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, navigate through a river under the cover of smoke during the culminating event of the Jungle Warfare Training Center’s jungle operations course here, Sept. 30. The Marines underwent a week of instruction in jungle warfare and survival skills. The culminating event tested the Marines in a jungle obstacle course spanning three miles through the Okinawan jungle. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region. - Marines with Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, navigate through a river under the cover of smoke during the culminating event of the Jungle Warfare Training Center’s jungle operations course here, Sept. 30. The Marines underwent a week of instruction in jungle warfare and survival skills. The culminating event tested the Marines in a jungle obstacle course spanning three miles through the Okinawan jungle. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region.

Marines of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and Sailors of the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) discuss with their host a meeting time for the conclusion of shopping at the Stanley Market here, Sept 20. The service members were participating in the Meals in the Home program while on liberty. The program, sponsored by the American Women’s Association of Hong Kong, aims to provide a home-like environment for Marines and Sailors from ships entering Hong Kong. The liberty port was a scheduled stop on the 31st MEU’s regularly scheduled Fall Patrol. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU. - Marines of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and Sailors of the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) discuss with their host a meeting time for the conclusion of shopping at the Stanley Market here, Sept 20. The service members were participating in the Meals in the Home program while on liberty. The program, sponsored by the American Women’s Association of Hong Kong, aims to provide a home-like environment for Marines and Sailors from ships entering Hong Kong. The liberty port was a scheduled stop on the 31st MEU’s regularly scheduled Fall Patrol. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.

Sergeant Miguel A. Lopez (left), the 27-year-old Military Information Support Operations team leader and a native of Santa Anna, Calif., and Sgt. Wesly T. Weber (right), the 25-year-old MISO non-commissioned officer in charge and a native of Rochester, N.Y., both with the Command Element, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, test a Long Range Acoustic Device 100x from the inside of an MV-22 Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, here, Sept. 17. The team tested the device to ensure it could be operated effectively over the noise of the Osprey. Two LRAD devices were tethered together in order to boost the volume and compensate for the surrounding aircraft noise. The LRAD met expectations by providing a crisp, clear message over the sound of the aircraft’s rotors from more than 500 meters away. The 31st MEU is currently conducting their regularly scheduled Fall Patrol. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU. - Sergeant Miguel A. Lopez (left), the 27-year-old Military Information Support Operations team leader and a native of Santa Anna, Calif., and Sgt. Wesly T. Weber (right), the 25-year-old MISO non-commissioned officer in charge and a native of Rochester, N.Y., both with the Command Element, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, test a Long Range Acoustic Device 100x from the inside of an MV-22 Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, here, Sept. 17. The team tested the device to ensure it could be operated effectively over the noise of the Osprey. Two LRAD devices were tethered together in order to boost the volume and compensate for the surrounding aircraft noise. The LRAD met expectations by providing a crisp, clear message over the sound of the aircraft’s rotors from more than 500 meters away. The 31st MEU is currently conducting their regularly scheduled Fall Patrol. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.

A landing support specialist with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, watches a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, prepare to lift a load of cargo off the flight deck here, Sept. 13. The Helicopter Support Team of CLB-31 and the crews of the helicopters play important roles in the 31st MEU’s capability to execute external lifts. The HST provides ground support to the CH-53E, which can lift up to 36,000 pounds. This lift capability can be used to overcome difficult terrain and land-based obstacles when executing logistical re-supply. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward deployed MEU. - A landing support specialist with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, watches a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, prepare to lift a load of cargo off the flight deck here, Sept. 13. The Helicopter Support Team of CLB-31 and the crews of the helicopters play important roles in the 31st MEU’s capability to execute external lifts. The HST provides ground support to the CH-53E, which can lift up to 36,000 pounds. This lift capability can be used to overcome difficult terrain and land-based obstacles when executing logistical re-supply. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward deployed MEU.

Corporal Jacob A. Flury, a 20-year-old artillery fire-support observer with Company F., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Damascus, Oreg., executes a movement with a non-commissioned officer sword during a Corporals Course class on the bow of the ship here, Sept.14. Newly-promoted corporals of the company have been conducting the course periodically throughout the 31st MEU’s regularly-scheduled Fall Patrol. They began their class three months ago at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, and have adapted to the confines of the ship in order to continue training. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU. - Corporal Jacob A. Flury, a 20-year-old artillery fire-support observer with Company F., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Damascus, Oreg., executes a movement with a non-commissioned officer sword during a Corporals Course class on the bow of the ship here, Sept.14. Newly-promoted corporals of the company have been conducting the course periodically throughout the 31st MEU’s regularly-scheduled Fall Patrol. They began their class three months ago at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, and have adapted to the confines of the ship in order to continue training. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.

DARWIN, Northern Territory, Australia –Marines with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit help guide a High-Mobility, Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle onto the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD- 6) during the retrograde following Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 9. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct a week-long, live-fire training exercise. Also participating in the exercise was were the Marines of Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or toand pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward deployed MEU. - DARWIN, Northern Territory, Australia –Marines with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit help guide a High-Mobility, Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle onto the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD- 6) during the retrograde following Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 9. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct a week-long, live-fire training exercise. Also participating in the exercise was were the Marines of Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or toand pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward deployed MEU.

Navy Lt. Chris A. Cruz, a 29-year-old medical doctor for Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Arlington, Texas, provides an intra-articular, sub-patella injection for pain relief during Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 4. The doctors and corpsmen of the 31st MEU’s logistics combat element and command element operate multiple aid stations to maintain the health of more than 250 Marines and Sailors training in the area. Koolendong demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU and reinforces why it is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. - Navy Lt. Chris A. Cruz, a 29-year-old medical doctor for Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Arlington, Texas, provides an intra-articular, sub-patella injection for pain relief during Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 4. The doctors and corpsmen of the 31st MEU’s logistics combat element and command element operate multiple aid stations to maintain the health of more than 250 Marines and Sailors training in the area. Koolendong demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU and reinforces why it is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces.

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31st Marine Expeditionary Unit