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Archive: November, 2013
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A Filipino carries a 110 lbs. bag of rice from the back of an MV-22 Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron-265, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), during a supply drop-off at a village here, Nov. 25. The combined Philippine and international effort delivered more than 79,000 lbs. of rice and high-energy biscuits to eight island villages. The 31st MEU, deployed with 3D Marine Expeditionary Brigade, in support of Joint Task Force 505, is currently supporting the government of the Philippines during Operation Damayan by assisting with disaster relief efforts in areas affected by Super Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda. - A Filipino carries a 110 lbs. bag of rice from the back of an MV-22 Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron-265, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), during a supply drop-off at a village here, Nov. 25. The combined Philippine and international effort delivered more than 79,000 lbs. of rice and high-energy biscuits to eight island villages. The 31st MEU, deployed with 3D Marine Expeditionary Brigade, in support of Joint Task Force 505, is currently supporting the government of the Philippines during Operation Damayan by assisting with disaster relief efforts in areas affected by Super Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda.

First Lt. Jose Eugenio E. Eclavia, security officer for the Philippine Navy Ship Gregorio Del Pilar, Patrol Force 15, and a native of IloIlo City, Republic of the Philippines, talks to the executive officer of his ship from the deck of USS Germantown (LSD 42), Nov. 21. Eclavia is a liaison officer from the Philippine Marine Corps working with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit to help coordinate disaster relief efforts in support of Operation Damayan. The 31st MEU and the ships of Amphibious Squadron are capable of delivering robust air, ground, and maritime transportation; medical and dental health services; distribution services for food, water and other supplies; and engineering assets for infrastructure repair and road clearance. The 31st MEU is deployed at the request of the government of the Republic of the Philippines and in coordination with Joint Task Force 505 personnel and the U.S. Agency for International Development. - First Lt. Jose Eugenio E. Eclavia, security officer for the Philippine Navy Ship Gregorio Del Pilar, Patrol Force 15, and a native of IloIlo City, Republic of the Philippines, talks to the executive officer of his ship from the deck of USS Germantown (LSD 42), Nov. 21. Eclavia is a liaison officer from the Philippine Marine Corps working with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit to help coordinate disaster relief efforts in support of Operation Damayan. The 31st MEU and the ships of Amphibious Squadron are capable of delivering robust air, ground, and maritime transportation; medical and dental health services; distribution services for food, water and other supplies; and engineering assets for infrastructure repair and road clearance. The 31st MEU is deployed at the request of the government of the Republic of the Philippines and in coordination with Joint Task Force 505 personnel and the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Corporal Michael R. Hough, intelligence specialist with Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Sacramento, Calif., holds the company guidon during a promotion ceremony here, Nov. 1. The unit adds two unique elements to the Marine Corps’ traditional promotion ceremony in order to highlight the importance of becoming an NCO. To reinforce the responsibility of the new rank, the NCO’s Creed is read, which states the role of NCO leadership, and a 1-inch red stripe is draped over the necks of the new NCO’s. Dating back to 1849, NCO’s and officers have worn this stripe on the outer edge of their trousers. When the creed is finished, the Marine’s mentors remove the rank of Lance Corporal and promote the Marine to Corporal. BLT 2/4 recently completed a three month tour of the Asia-Pacific region, which included bilateral training with the Australian Defense Force. They are now preparing to return to their home port, Camp Pendleton, Calif., after a successful tour as the 31st MEU’s BLT. - Corporal Michael R. Hough, intelligence specialist with Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Sacramento, Calif., holds the company guidon during a promotion ceremony here, Nov. 1. The unit adds two unique elements to the Marine Corps’ traditional promotion ceremony in order to highlight the importance of becoming an NCO. To reinforce the responsibility of the new rank, the NCO’s Creed is read, which states the role of NCO leadership, and a 1-inch red stripe is draped over the necks of the new NCO’s. Dating back to 1849, NCO’s and officers have worn this stripe on the outer edge of their trousers. When the creed is finished, the Marine’s mentors remove the rank of Lance Corporal and promote the Marine to Corporal. BLT 2/4 recently completed a three month tour of the Asia-Pacific region, which included bilateral training with the Australian Defense Force. They are now preparing to return to their home port, Camp Pendleton, Calif., after a successful tour as the 31st MEU’s BLT.

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31st Marine Expeditionary Unit