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Archive: October, 2013
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Marines with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit’s Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company detachment treat a simulated casualty while arranging an evacuation during a sustainment training event here, Oct. 31. The detachment, along with members of 5th ANGLICO, honed their numerous combat proficiencies during a two-day training session. Basic patrolling, combat life-saving, landing zone selection, casualty evacuation and “talking-on” close air support were the primary skills practiced during the training. The ANGLICO detachment provides the 31st MEU commander a liaison capability and plans, coordinates, and conducts terminal control of fires in support of joint, allied and coalition forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward deployed MEU. - Marines with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit’s Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company detachment treat a simulated casualty while arranging an evacuation during a sustainment training event here, Oct. 31. The detachment, along with members of 5th ANGLICO, honed their numerous combat proficiencies during a two-day training session. Basic patrolling, combat life-saving, landing zone selection, casualty evacuation and “talking-on” close air support were the primary skills practiced during the training. The ANGLICO detachment provides the 31st MEU commander a liaison capability and plans, coordinates, and conducts terminal control of fires in support of joint, allied and coalition forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward deployed MEU.

A CH-53E Super Stallion with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, moves heavy cargo during external lift training here, Oct. 31. External lifts move large cargo from one place to another via helicopter when rough terrain prevents the load from being transported by ground or when the cargo has to move from ship to shore quickly. With the 36,000 pound lift capability of the Super Stallion, this capability can provide transportation for anything from M777A2 Lightweight Howitzers to a pallet of Meals Ready-to-Eat. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region and is the only continuously forward deployed MEU. - A CH-53E Super Stallion with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, moves heavy cargo during external lift training here, Oct. 31. External lifts move large cargo from one place to another via helicopter when rough terrain prevents the load from being transported by ground or when the cargo has to move from ship to shore quickly. With the 36,000 pound lift capability of the Super Stallion, this capability can provide transportation for anything from M777A2 Lightweight Howitzers to a pallet of Meals Ready-to-Eat. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region and is the only continuously forward deployed MEU.

Marines with Combined Anti-Armor Team, Weapons Co., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, operate a Humvee during a mission in the Combat Convoy Simulator here, Oct. 29. The CCS puts the Marines in realistic situations, using recoil simulating systems while maneuvering through a variety of scenarios in a combat zone. The $5.5 million training facility can simulate high value target extractions, security patrols, medical evacuations and calling for close-air support. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region and is the only continuously forward deployed MEU. - Marines with Combined Anti-Armor Team, Weapons Co., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, operate a Humvee during a mission in the Combat Convoy Simulator here, Oct. 29. The CCS puts the Marines in realistic situations, using recoil simulating systems while maneuvering through a variety of scenarios in a combat zone. The $5.5 million training facility can simulate high value target extractions, security patrols, medical evacuations and calling for close-air support. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region and is the only continuously forward deployed MEU.

A corpsman with Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fires at his target during a marksmanship qualification event as a part of the battalion’s Corpsman Cup here, Oct. 22. The competition included all “docs” within the battalion and tested medical skills used during combat, in garrison and on ship. The competition served a dual purpose in honing the sailors’ skills under pressure and providing a fun bonding experience. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU. - A corpsman with Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fires at his target during a marksmanship qualification event as a part of the battalion’s Corpsman Cup here, Oct. 22. The competition included all “docs” within the battalion and tested medical skills used during combat, in garrison and on ship. The competition served a dual purpose in honing the sailors’ skills under pressure and providing a fun bonding experience. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.

Corporal Daniel A. Zamarron, a heavy equipment mechanic with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Laredo, Texas, removes the differential drain plug on a forklift as part of the unit’s “Maintenance Stand-down” here, Oct. 17. The initiative occurs before and after every 31st MEU deployment, ensuring every vehicle and piece of equipment is inspected and repaired in preparation for the next patrol or mission. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU. - Corporal Daniel A. Zamarron, a heavy equipment mechanic with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Laredo, Texas, removes the differential drain plug on a forklift as part of the unit’s “Maintenance Stand-down” here, Oct. 17. The initiative occurs before and after every 31st MEU deployment, ensuring every vehicle and piece of equipment is inspected and repaired in preparation for the next patrol or mission. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.

Marines with Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, climb out of a pool during a combat endurance course here, Oct. 9. The endurance course is a two-day event consisting of various exercises at stations around Camp Hansen, including: performing mask drills in the gas chamber, digging a fighting hole, calling a “nine-line” casualty evacuation, swimming laps in a pool and assembling different weapon systems. The purpose of the course is to keep tactical skills fresh in a garrison environment. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward deployed MEU. - Marines with Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, climb out of a pool during a combat endurance course here, Oct. 9. The endurance course is a two-day event consisting of various exercises at stations around Camp Hansen, including: performing mask drills in the gas chamber, digging a fighting hole, calling a “nine-line” casualty evacuation, swimming laps in a pool and assembling different weapon systems. The purpose of the course is to keep tactical skills fresh in a garrison environment. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward deployed MEU.

1st Lt. Timothy R. Greene, a 25-year-old platoon commander for Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Granbury, Texas, leads Marines and Sailors in a service celebrating Rash Hashanah, Jewish New Year, here Sept. 5. Between the unit chaplains and lay leaders like Greene, the Marines and Sailors deployed at sea have access to a wide range of religious services. Marines and Sailors with Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, offload from an MV-22 Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, to participate in Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Aug. 30. The 31st MEU is moving a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct a live-fire training exercise. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU. - 1st Lt. Timothy R. Greene, a 25-year-old platoon commander for Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Granbury, Texas, leads Marines and Sailors in a service celebrating Rash Hashanah, Jewish New Year, here Sept. 5. Between the unit chaplains and lay leaders like Greene, the Marines and Sailors deployed at sea have access to a wide range of religious services. Marines and Sailors with Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, offload from an MV-22 Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, to participate in Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Aug. 30. The 31st MEU is moving a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct a live-fire training exercise. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.

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31st Marine Expeditionary Unit