Results:
Archive: June, 2012
CLEAR ALL

Australian Light Armoured Vehicles prepare to depart before the major offensive of Exercise Hamel 2012 begins here, June 24. Preluding the main operations, Marines of Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, integrate with Australian Army units to engage the Army’s 1st Brigade for the multi-week scenario. The exercise certifies the Australian unit for deployment. Exercise Hamel is a multi-national training evolution between Australia and New Zealand, with this year being the first with U.S. Marine participation. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and is the nation’s force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region. - Australian Light Armoured Vehicles prepare to depart before the major offensive of Exercise Hamel 2012 begins here, June 24. Preluding the main operations, Marines of Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, integrate with Australian Army units to engage the Army’s 1st Brigade for the multi-week scenario. The exercise certifies the Australian unit for deployment. Exercise Hamel is a multi-national training evolution between Australia and New Zealand, with this year being the first with U.S. Marine participation. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and is the nation’s force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region.

Marines of 3rd platoon, Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, prepare to fly in a KC-130 en route to Darwin, Australia to participate in Exercise Hamel 2012, June 16. With the Marines' final destination in Rockhampton, they will work alongside the Australian Army and other defense personnel in the region during the month long exercise, supporting the certification training of the Australian Army's 1st Brigade. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and is the nation's force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region. - Marines of 3rd platoon, Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, prepare to fly in a KC-130 en route to Darwin, Australia to participate in Exercise Hamel 2012, June 16. With the Marines' final destination in Rockhampton, they will work alongside the Australian Army and other defense personnel in the region during the month long exercise, supporting the certification training of the Australian Army's 1st Brigade. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and is the nation's force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region.

Staff Sgt. John Rudd, an explosives ordnance disposal team leader for Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, accepts a non-commissioned officer sword in recognition of his selection as honor graduate for Career Course 4-12, Staff Non-Commissioned Officer Academy, here, June 12. This achievement is a continuation of Rudd's distinguished record, after receiving the Bronze Star with combat distinguishing device in April, for his actions in an engagement with Taliban Forces in Afghanistan. Under enemy fire, Rudd disabled an improvised explosive device and provided critical care to a wounded Afghan child during a deployment in July, 2011. - Staff Sgt. John Rudd, an explosives ordnance disposal team leader for Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, accepts a non-commissioned officer sword in recognition of his selection as honor graduate for Career Course 4-12, Staff Non-Commissioned Officer Academy, here, June 12. This achievement is a continuation of Rudd's distinguished record, after receiving the Bronze Star with combat distinguishing device in April, for his actions in an engagement with Taliban Forces in Afghanistan. Under enemy fire, Rudd disabled an improvised explosive device and provided critical care to a wounded Afghan child during a deployment in July, 2011.

The colors of Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, are handed from Lt. Col. William E. Arick (right), past Sgt. Maj. Anthony P. Goss (center), to Maj. Omar J. Randall (left), during an official change of command ceremony here, June 7. Arick relinquished command after two years commanding the logistics combat element of the 31st MEU, including a pivotal role in the relief efforts of Typhoon Megi in the Republic of the Philippines and the earthquake and tsunami relief during Operation Tomadachi in Japan. The 31st MEU is the United States' force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region and the Marine Corps' only continuously forward deployed expeditionary unit. - The colors of Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, are handed from Lt. Col. William E. Arick (right), past Sgt. Maj. Anthony P. Goss (center), to Maj. Omar J. Randall (left), during an official change of command ceremony here, June 7. Arick relinquished command after two years commanding the logistics combat element of the 31st MEU, including a pivotal role in the relief efforts of Typhoon Megi in the Republic of the Philippines and the earthquake and tsunami relief during Operation Tomadachi in Japan. The 31st MEU is the United States' force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region and the Marine Corps' only continuously forward deployed expeditionary unit.

RSS
31st Marine Expeditionary Unit