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Archive: April, 2012
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Staff Sgt. John Rudd, an explosive ordinance disposal technician with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (center right) stands with his wife and Lt Col. William Arick, commanding officer of CLB-31 (left) and Capt. Donald Pilcher, company commander of EOD Company, 9th Engineer Support Battalion, after receiving the Bronze Star with combat distinguishing device here, Apr. 30 for his actions in Afghanistan in 2011 during Operation Enduring Freedom. Rudd earned the medal for both disarming an improvised explosive device under fire and saving a local child's life. - Staff Sgt. John Rudd, an explosive ordinance disposal technician with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (center right) stands with his wife and Lt Col. William Arick, commanding officer of CLB-31 (left) and Capt. Donald Pilcher, company commander of EOD Company, 9th Engineer Support Battalion, after receiving the Bronze Star with combat distinguishing device here, Apr. 30 for his actions in Afghanistan in 2011 during Operation Enduring Freedom. Rudd earned the medal for both disarming an improvised explosive device under fire and saving a local child's life.

Lieutenant Col. Damien "Faulkner" Marsh, commanding officer of Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 265 (REIN), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, applies a temporary Dragon tattoo to a fan during a static display of CH-46E Sea Knight helicopters at the Atsugi Air Show, Atsugi Naval Air Facility, Japan, on April 28. The Marines' participation in the event comes one year after their assistance to Japanese tsunami victims during Operation Tomodachi. The 31st MEU is the United States' expeditionary force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region. - Lieutenant Col. Damien "Faulkner" Marsh, commanding officer of Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 265 (REIN), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, applies a temporary Dragon tattoo to a fan during a static display of CH-46E Sea Knight helicopters at the Atsugi Air Show, Atsugi Naval Air Facility, Japan, on April 28. The Marines' participation in the event comes one year after their assistance to Japanese tsunami victims during Operation Tomodachi. The 31st MEU is the United States' expeditionary force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region.

A Marine with 1st Platoon, Company B., Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, crawls through a watery ditch and under concertina wire during the Jungle Endurance Course here, April 20. After completing a two-week training evolution at the Jungle Warfare Training Center, the Marines underwent the four-mile-long course through the Okinawan jungle, utilizing the rappelling, rope-crossing, improvised stretcher carry and other skills they learned. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and remains the nation’s force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region. - A Marine with 1st Platoon, Company B., Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, crawls through a watery ditch and under concertina wire during the Jungle Endurance Course here, April 20. After completing a two-week training evolution at the Jungle Warfare Training Center, the Marines underwent the four-mile-long course through the Okinawan jungle, utilizing the rappelling, rope-crossing, improvised stretcher carry and other skills they learned. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and remains the nation’s force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region.

Lance Cpl. Kinley Ray, a radio operator with Command Element, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, looks into the entrance of an underground network of tunnels, used by Japanese soldiers in World War II, during a Battle of Okinawa tour here, April 17. Marines with the Command Element of the 31st MEU engaged in the day-long tour of four sites throughout southern Okinawa, learning the events that unfolded which eventually brought them to be stationed on the island. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and is the nation's force-in-readiness in the Asia-Pacific region. - Lance Cpl. Kinley Ray, a radio operator with Command Element, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, looks into the entrance of an underground network of tunnels, used by Japanese soldiers in World War II, during a Battle of Okinawa tour here, April 17. Marines with the Command Element of the 31st MEU engaged in the day-long tour of four sites throughout southern Okinawa, learning the events that unfolded which eventually brought them to be stationed on the island. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and is the nation's force-in-readiness in the Asia-Pacific region.

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31st Marine Expeditionary Unit