1st Lt. Alex Cervantes, a field artillery officer with Fox Company, Battalion Landing Team (BLT), 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), from Corona, California, graduated May of 2018 from the University of Notre Dame with a Bachelor’s of Science in Aerospace Engineering before deciding to join the Marines. He commissioned in June 2018, his very first salute to his father, Benny Cervantez, who served from 1984-1992. Cervantez is currently serving with the 31st MEU aboard USS New Orleans (LPD 18). - 1st Lt. Alex Cervantes, a field artillery officer with Fox Company, Battalion Landing Team (BLT), 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), from Corona, California, graduated May of 2018 from the University of Notre Dame with a Bachelor’s of Science in Aerospace Engineering before deciding to join the Marines. He commissioned in June 2018, his very first salute to his father, Benny Cervantez, who served from 1984-1992. Cervantez is currently serving with the 31st MEU aboard USS New Orleans (LPD 18).

PHILIPPINE SEA (Sept. 17, 2020) 1st Lt. Rio Sarmiento, assigned to the 16th Space Control Squadron (SPCS), was administered the oath of office into the United States Space Force by U.S. Marine Col. Michael Nakonieczny, commanding officer of the 31st MEU, aboard amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6). Sarmiento was transferred from being an Air Force Space Operations Officer to becoming the first Space Force Liaison Officer (LNO) deployed with the 31st MEU. America, flagship of the America Expeditionary Strike Group, 31st MEU team, is operating in the U.S. 7th fleet area of operations to enhance interoperability with allies and partners and serve as a ready response force to defend peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brienna Tuck) - PHILIPPINE SEA (Sept. 17, 2020) 1st Lt. Rio Sarmiento, assigned to the 16th Space Control Squadron (SPCS), was administered the oath of office into the United States Space Force by U.S. Marine Col. Michael Nakonieczny, commanding officer of the 31st MEU, aboard amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6). Sarmiento was transferred from being an Air Force Space Operations Officer to becoming the first Space Force Liaison Officer (LNO) deployed with the 31st MEU. America, flagship of the America Expeditionary Strike Group, 31st MEU team, is operating in the U.S. 7th fleet area of operations to enhance interoperability with allies and partners and serve as a ready response force to defend peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brienna Tuck)

Marines with Combined Anti-Armor Team 1 (CAAT), Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), clean the beach at Kin Blue, Okinawa, Japan, July 25, 2020. At the conclusion of their training, CAAT-1 picked up trash that had washed up on the beach in order to leave the environment better than they found it. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. The 31st MEU has implemented strict health protection measures and will continue to conduct mission essential training in support of regional security and stability. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Kolby Leger) - Marines with Combined Anti-Armor Team 1 (CAAT), Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), clean the beach at Kin Blue, Okinawa, Japan, July 25, 2020. At the conclusion of their training, CAAT-1 picked up trash that had washed up on the beach in order to leave the environment better than they found it. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. The 31st MEU has implemented strict health protection measures and will continue to conduct mission essential training in support of regional security and stability. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Kolby Leger)

Lance Cpl. Benjamin Carr, a tiltrotor crew chief with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fires an M240 machine gun during a training exercise at a tail gun range off the coast of Okinawa, Japan, July 30, 2020. The training consisted of field carrier landing practice and live firing from an MV-22B Osprey Tiltrotor aircraft. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. The 31st MEU has implemented strict health protection measures and will continue to conduct mission essential training in support of regional security and stability. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brienna Tuck) - Lance Cpl. Benjamin Carr, a tiltrotor crew chief with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fires an M240 machine gun during a training exercise at a tail gun range off the coast of Okinawa, Japan, July 30, 2020. The training consisted of field carrier landing practice and live firing from an MV-22B Osprey Tiltrotor aircraft. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. The 31st MEU has implemented strict health protection measures and will continue to conduct mission essential training in support of regional security and stability. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brienna Tuck)

Marines with Company E, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines run to board a MV22B Osprey during aviation integration training at Futenma Air Station, Okinawa, Japan, June 29, 2020. The training was conducted with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262, Reinforced, to increase Interoperability (Interop) training. Interop enhances coordination and familiarizes subordinate elements with the unique mission set of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU). The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Dominic Clay) - Marines with Company E, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines run to board a MV22B Osprey during aviation integration training at Futenma Air Station, Okinawa, Japan, June 29, 2020. The training was conducted with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262, Reinforced, to increase Interoperability (Interop) training. Interop enhances coordination and familiarizes subordinate elements with the unique mission set of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU). The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Dominic Clay)

Col. Michael Nakonieczny, left, the oncoming commanding officer of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) and native of Buena Park, California, and Col. Robert Brodie, the departing commanding officer of the 31st MEU and a native of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, stand in front of the U.S. and unit colors at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, June 25, 2020. During Brodie’s two years in command of the 31st MEU, the unit completed four full unit-deployment cycles including training, exercises, and real-world operations throughout the Indo-Pacific region. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps' only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Audrey M. C. Rampton) - Col. Michael Nakonieczny, left, the oncoming commanding officer of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) and native of Buena Park, California, and Col. Robert Brodie, the departing commanding officer of the 31st MEU and a native of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, stand in front of the U.S. and unit colors at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, June 25, 2020. During Brodie’s two years in command of the 31st MEU, the unit completed four full unit-deployment cycles including training, exercises, and real-world operations throughout the Indo-Pacific region. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps' only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Audrey M. C. Rampton)

Lance Cpl. Darrek Proctor, a machine gunner with Charlie Company, Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), practices marksmanship fundamentals from the seated position on Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, May 7, 2020. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps' only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Andrew R. Bray) - Lance Cpl. Darrek Proctor, a machine gunner with Charlie Company, Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), practices marksmanship fundamentals from the seated position on Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, May 7, 2020. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps' only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Andrew R. Bray)

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31st Marine Expeditionary Unit