31st Marine Expeditionary Unit

 

31st Marine Expeditionary Unit

The only continuously forward-deployed MEU

Okinawa, Japan
Australia
Bulk fuel specialists with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, re-fuel an MV-22 Osprey during flight operations in support of Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. VMM-265 (REIN) is supporting a battalion-sized element from an expeditionary airfield more than 300 miles inland from the port of Darwin for the exercise. Koolendong demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. Marines and Sailors with Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, offload from an MV-22 Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, to participate in Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Aug. 30. The 31st MEU is moving a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct a live-fire training exercise. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Fill 'er up!
Bulk fuel specialists with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, re-fuel an MV-22 Osprey during flight operations in support of Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. VMM-265 (REIN) is supporting a battalion-sized element from an expeditionary airfield more than 300 miles inland from the port of Darwin for the exercise. Koolendong demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. Marines and Sailors with Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, offload from an MV-22 Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, to participate in Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Aug. 30. The 31st MEU is moving a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct a live-fire training exercise. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Corporal Andrew W. Hall, a 25-year-old squad leader with Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Chandler, Texas, calls out commands while advancing during a live-fire maneuver exercise here, Sept. 4. The event was part of Exercise Koolendong 13, where the 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Move and communicate
Corporal Andrew W. Hall, a 25-year-old squad leader with Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Chandler, Texas, calls out commands while advancing during a live-fire maneuver exercise here, Sept. 4. The event was part of Exercise Koolendong 13, where the 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Marines with Weapons Co., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, charge up a hill to set up crew-served weapons during a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Charging the hill
Marines with Weapons Co., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, charge up a hill to set up crew-served weapons during a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
A Marine with Weapons Co., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fires the M777A2 Lightweight Howitzer during a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Shaking the earth
A Marine with Weapons Co., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fires the M777A2 Lightweight Howitzer during a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Marines with Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, walk back from the range following a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Victory walk
Marines with Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, walk back from the range following a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Marines with Weapons Co., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fire the Expeditionary Fire Support System, a rifled-towed 120mm mortar, during a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Kicking up dust
Marines with Weapons Co., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fire the Expeditionary Fire Support System, a rifled-towed 120mm mortar, during a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Lance Cpl. John Ready, an M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle gunner for Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, provides security as an MV-22 Osprey from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, takes off after inserting a platoon of Marines during a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Dropped off into the fight
Lance Cpl. John Ready, an M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle gunner for Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, provides security as an MV-22 Osprey from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, takes off after inserting a platoon of Marines during a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Marines with Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, bound forward during a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Outback assault
Marines with Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, bound forward during a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
A Marine with Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, takes cover as an 81mm mortar fires during a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Round out
A Marine with Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, takes cover as an 81mm mortar fires during a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Light Armored Vehicle 25’s with Weapons Co., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, pull off the dirt road and orient toward their targets during a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Change of direction
Light Armored Vehicle 25’s with Weapons Co., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, pull off the dirt road and orient toward their targets during a combined, live-fire exercise for Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 3. The 31st MEU moved a battalion-sized force more than 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin to conduct training. The exercise demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Sergeant Brian D. Richardson, a 29-year-old crew chief for Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Leesburg, Fla., fires a 7.62mm GAU-17/A weapon system at enemy targets from a UH-1Y Venom helicopter during live-fire training as part of Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 2. Three Venom helicopters and four MV-22 Osprey aircraft are operating from an expeditionary airfield 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin, supporting the battalion-sized element conducting the exercise. Koolendong demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Six barrels of fun
Sergeant Brian D. Richardson, a 29-year-old crew chief for Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Leesburg, Fla., fires a 7.62mm GAU-17/A weapon system at enemy targets from a UH-1Y Venom helicopter during live-fire training as part of Exercise Koolendong 13 here, Sept. 2. Three Venom helicopters and four MV-22 Osprey aircraft are operating from an expeditionary airfield 300 miles inland from the Port of Darwin, supporting the battalion-sized element conducting the exercise. Koolendong demonstrates the operational reach of the 31st MEU. Also participating in the exercise is the Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and soldiers of the 5th Royal Australian Regiment. The 31st MEU brings what it needs to sustain itself to accomplish the mission or to pave the way for follow-on forces. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps' force in readiness for the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Marines and Sailors with Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, exit MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft during the initial stages of exercise Talisman Saber 2013 here, July 20. 
Company G. served as the MEU’s initial ground forces by securing a beach landing site and a nearby airfield. Talisman Saber 2013 is a biennial training exercise between approximately 18,000 joint U.S. forces and approximately 9,000 Australian forces, aimed at improving combat readiness and interoperability. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Dropped off by Osprey
SHOALWATER BAY TRAINING AREA, Queensland, Australia - Marines and Sailors with Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, exit MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft during the initial stages of exercise Talisman Saber 2013 here, July 20. Company G. served as the MEU’s initial ground forces by securing a beach landing site and a nearby airfield. Talisman Saber 2013 is a biennial training exercise between approximately 18,000 joint U.S. forces and approximately 9,000 Australian forces, aimed at improving combat readiness and interoperability. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Marines and Sailors of Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, provide security while evacuating casualties after an ambush during Talisman Saber 2013, here, July 23. Australian Army soldiers of the 7th Brigade are serving as the opposing force during the biennial training exercise which is designed to foster and sustain cooperative international relationships that enhance regional security, stability and prosperity. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region and is the only continuously forward deployed MEU.
Ambush
SHOALWATER BAY TRAINING AREA, Queensland, Australia - Marines and Sailors of Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, provide security while evacuating casualties after an ambush during Talisman Saber 2013, here, July 23. Australian Army soldiers of the 7th Brigade are serving as the opposing force during the biennial training exercise which is designed to foster and sustain cooperative international relationships that enhance regional security, stability and prosperity. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region and is the only continuously forward deployed MEU.
Marines and Sailors of Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, provide security for the rest of the unit’s advance during an aerial assault as a part of Talisman Saber 2013, here, July 21. The Marines and Sailors of the 31st MEU and Amphibious Squadron 11 are part of an integrated force of approximately 18,000 U.S. service members training alongside approximately 9,000 Australian service members in the fifth iteration of Talisman Saber 2013, a month-long biennial exercise designed to enhance multilateral collaboration in support of future combined operations, natural disaster, humanitarian and emergency response. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Securing down under
SHOALWATER BAY TRAINING AREA, Queensland, Australia - Marines and Sailors of Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, provide security for the rest of the unit’s advance during an aerial assault as a part of Talisman Saber 2013, here, July 21. The Marines and Sailors of the 31st MEU and Amphibious Squadron 11 are part of an integrated force of approximately 18,000 U.S. service members training alongside approximately 9,000 Australian service members in the fifth iteration of Talisman Saber 2013, a month-long biennial exercise designed to enhance multilateral collaboration in support of future combined operations, natural disaster, humanitarian and emergency response. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Marines and Sailors with Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, move from a beach landing site to an enemy airfield during the initial stages of exercise Talisman Saber 2013 here, July 20. Company G. served as the MEU’s initial ground forces by securing a beach landing site and a nearby airfield. Talisman Saber 2013 is a biennial training exercise between approximately 18,000 joint U.S. forces and approximately 9,000 Australian forces, aimed at improving combat readiness and interoperability. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Not a joy ride
SHOALWATER BAY TRAINING AREA, Queensland, Australia - Marines and Sailors with Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, move from a beach landing site to an enemy airfield during the initial stages of exercise Talisman Saber 2013 here, July 20. Company G. served as the MEU’s initial ground forces by securing a beach landing site and a nearby airfield. Talisman Saber 2013 is a biennial training exercise between approximately 18,000 joint U.S. forces and approximately 9,000 Australian forces, aimed at improving combat readiness and interoperability. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
An AH-1W Super Cobra helicopter from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced) circles overhead as Marines and Sailors with Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, land in Amphibious Assault Vehicles during the initial stages of exercise Talisman Saber 2013 here, July 20. Company G. served as the MEU’s initial ground forces by securing a beach landing site and a nearby airfield. Talisman Saber 2013 is a biennial training exercise between approximately 18,000 joint U.S. forces and approximately 9,000 Australian forces, aimed at improving combat readiness and interoperability. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Guardian angel
SHOALWATER BAY TRAINING AREA, Queensland, Australia - An AH-1W Super Cobra helicopter from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced) circles overhead as Marines and Sailors with Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, land in Amphibious Assault Vehicles during the initial stages of exercise Talisman Saber 2013 here, July 20. Company G. served as the MEU’s initial ground forces by securing a beach landing site and a nearby airfield. Talisman Saber 2013 is a biennial training exercise between approximately 18,000 joint U.S. forces and approximately 9,000 Australian forces, aimed at improving combat readiness and interoperability. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Marines and Sailors with Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, rest on the beach following a two-hour ride ashore in amphibious assault vehicles here, July 15. The Marines and Sailors of Co. G. and Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st MEU, are preparing to participate in exercise Talisman Saber 2013, a bilateral training exercise between the U.S. and Australian militaries, bolstering their interoperability and combat readiness as a Combined Joint Task Force. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region.
Taking a break
SHOALWATER BAY TRAINING AREA, Queensland, Australia - Marines and Sailors with Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, rest on the beach following a two-hour ride ashore in amphibious assault vehicles here, July 15. The Marines and Sailors of Co. G. and Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st MEU, are preparing to participate in exercise Talisman Saber 2013, a bilateral training exercise between the U.S. and Australian militaries, bolstering their interoperability and combat readiness as a Combined Joint Task Force. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region.
A Marine with Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, looks upon the USS Germantown (LSD 42) from the beach here, July 15. The Marines and Sailors of Co. G. and Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st MEU, are preparing to participate in exercise Talisman Saber 2013, a bilateral training exercise between the U.S. and Australian militaries, bolstering their interoperability and combat readiness as a Combined Joint Task Force. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region.
Enjoying the view
SHOALWATER BAY TRAINING AREA, Queensland, Australia - A Marine with Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, looks upon the USS Germantown (LSD 42) from the beach here, July 15. The Marines and Sailors of Co. G. and Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st MEU, are preparing to participate in exercise Talisman Saber 2013, a bilateral training exercise between the U.S. and Australian militaries, bolstering their interoperability and combat readiness as a Combined Joint Task Force. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region.
Corporal Bronson Radke, an anti-tank missileman with Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Roscoe, Ill., explains the nomenclature of an Mk-19 automatic grenade launcher to a young Australian boy during the opening ceremony for exercise Talisman Saber, here, July 14. The Marines and Sailors of the 31st MEU, PHIBRON 11, and Expeditionary Strike Group 7 will train alongside a joint U.S. force that totals approximately 18,000 personnel, as well as approximately 9,000 Australian service members in the fifth iteration of Talisman Saber, a month-long biennial exercise designed to enhance multilateral collaboration in support of future combined operations, natural disaster, humanitarian and emergency response.
What does that do?
ROCKHAMPTON, Queensland, Australia - Corporal Bronson Radke, an anti-tank missileman with Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Roscoe, Ill., explains the nomenclature of an Mk-19 automatic grenade launcher to a young Australian boy during the opening ceremony for exercise Talisman Saber, here, July 14. The Marines and Sailors of the 31st MEU, PHIBRON 11, and Expeditionary Strike Group 7 will train alongside a joint U.S. force that totals approximately 18,000 personnel, as well as approximately 9,000 Australian service members in the fifth iteration of Talisman Saber, a month-long biennial exercise designed to enhance multilateral collaboration in support of future combined operations, natural disaster, humanitarian and emergency response.
Marines and Sailors (left) of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and crew of the USS Bonhomme Richard engage in a scrum with players of the Brisbane West Bulldogs (right) during a rugby match here, July 12. The match was orchestrated weeks prior to the units’ arrival in Australia as a way for the service members to embrace some of the culture and build camaraderie. Over the next few weeks, the Marines and Sailors of the 31st MEU and the Amphibious Squadron 11 will conduct integrated training with their Australian counterparts in order to improve their cooperative ability to plan, communicate and conduct complex operations.
International scrum
BRISBANE, Northern Territory, Australia - Marines and Sailors (left) of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and crew of the USS Bonhomme Richard engage in a scrum with players of the Brisbane West Bulldogs (right) during a rugby match here, July 12. The match was orchestrated weeks prior to the units’ arrival in Australia as a way for the service members to embrace some of the culture and build camaraderie. Over the next few weeks, the Marines and Sailors of the 31st MEU and the Amphibious Squadron 11 will conduct integrated training with their Australian counterparts in order to improve their cooperative ability to plan, communicate and conduct complex operations.
Corporal Caleb E. Haynes, an assistant team leader for Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Laurel, Md., watches 6-year-old Brody, recently diagnosed with diabetes, play a game on his tablet during a visit here, July 10. Twelve Marines and Sailors of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit joined 22 crew members of the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6) during a visit to the Mater’s Rehabilitation Center and Mater’s Children Center to brighten the spirits of the patients. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
A video game tutorial
BRISBANE, Northern Territory, Australia - Corporal Caleb E. Haynes, an assistant team leader for Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and a native of Laurel, Md., watches 6-year-old Brody, recently diagnosed with diabetes, play a game on his tablet during a visit here, July 10. Twelve Marines and Sailors of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit joined 22 crew members of the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6) during a visit to the Mater’s Rehabilitation Center and Mater’s Children Center to brighten the spirits of the patients. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region and the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.
Training Down Under
Not as frequent as the 31st MEU's other ports, but just as vital, Marines visit the land "down under" to strengthen interoperability with their Aussie counterparts. Unlike Cobra Gold and PHIBLEX, the focus of exercises in Australia tend to be land based combat maneuvers rather than amphibious action on objective.
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